It's politics, not technology (was: "IT" is finally unveiled )

Pang, Hokkun HPang@Yesmail.com
Mon, 3 Dec 2001 12:31:07 -0600


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perhaps the real market for IT is in countries where 
a)the weather is mostly cooperating
b)availability of automobile is low
c)bicycle is the preferred choice of transportation.

seeing how people prefer SUV over smaller compact cars, 
I don't think IT will have a big market outside a few niche
areas in the US. you may see them in amusement parks or warehouses
but no city is bold enough to designate lanes and traffic codes
specifically to make IT safe and useable. cities with heavy traffic
congestion are also filled rich folks who don't mind paying $50k for
a parking spot. they ain't going to render their investment
worthless either.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russell Turpin [mailto:deafbox@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2001 1:04 PM
To: fork@xent.com
Subject: It's politics, not technology (was: "IT" is finally unveiled)


This is from the Times article:

  "Cars are great for going long distances," Kamen says,
  "but it makes no sense at all for people in cities to
  use a 4,000-lb. piece of metal to haul their 150-lb.
  asses around town." In the future he envisions, cars
  will be banished from urban centers to make room for
  millions of "empowered pedestrians"

The problem with this vision is not the lack of alternate
modes of transportation, but the political decision of
how to build out a city's transportation infrastructure.
Some cities have already banned automobiles from the
urban core. People get around fine, on foot, scooter,
skateboard, bicycle, and streetcar. Ginger is a neat
alternative, but not a revolutionary one. The revolution,
if there is to be one, will lie in the political arena
of how cities manage their transportation infrastructure.

Russell



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Re: It's politics, not technology  (was: "IT" is =
finally unveiled)



perhaps the real market for IT is in countries where =
a)the weather is mostly cooperating
b)availability of automobile is low
c)bicycle is the preferred choice of = transportation.

seeing how people prefer SUV over smaller compact = cars,
I don't think IT will have a big market outside a = few niche
areas in the US. you may see them in amusement parks = or warehouses
but no city is bold enough to designate lanes and = traffic codes
specifically to make IT safe and useable. cities = with heavy traffic
congestion are also filled rich folks who don't mind = paying $50k for
a parking spot. they ain't going to render their = investment
worthless either.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russell Turpin [mailto:deafbox@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2001 1:04 PM
To: fork@xent.com
Subject: It's politics, not technology (was: = "IT" is finally unveiled)


This is from the Times article:

  "Cars are great for going long = distances," Kamen says,
  "but it makes no sense at all for people = in cities to
  use a 4,000-lb. piece of metal to haul their = 150-lb.
  asses around town." In the future he = envisions, cars
  will be banished from urban centers to make = room for
  millions of "empowered = pedestrians"

The problem with this vision is not the lack of = alternate
modes of transportation, but the political decision = of
how to build out a city's transportation = infrastructure.
Some cities have already banned automobiles from = the
urban core. People get around fine, on foot, = scooter,
skateboard, bicycle, and streetcar. Ginger is a = neat
alternative, but not a revolutionary one. The = revolution,
if there is to be one, will lie in the political = arena
of how cities manage their transportation = infrastructure.

Russell



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Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp



http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork

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