Anyone we know ;-)

Peter Kilby peter.kilby@btconnect.com
Mon, 17 Dec 2001 12:05:07 -0000


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http://www.twst.com/pdf/endeavors_tech.pdf

       =20

      THE WALL STREET TRANSCRIPT=20
      =20
      =20
     Questioning Market Leaders For Long Term Investors   =20

       =20



      GREG BOLCER - ENDEAVORS TECHNOLOGY INC=20
      CEO Interview - published 12/17/2001=20

DOCUMENT # NAR609

GREG BOLCER is a co-founder of Endeavors Technology, Inc. and is
currently its Chief Technology Officer. At Endeavors Technology, Dr.
Bolcer founded the Magi_ project, a lightweight, open protocol, thin
server infrastructure for forming ad hoc, peer-to-peer networks and
accessing embedded systems through standard Web protocols. Prior to co-
founding Endeavors Technology, Dr. Bolcer's research team at UCI
received $4 million in grants from the Defense Advanced Research Project
Agency  non-Sun Microsystems project in the country. He was one of the
key working group participants and co-author for the widely supported
Simple Workflow Access Protocol (SWAP/WF-XML) extensions to HTTP/1.1 and
WebDAV (the Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning Protocol). Dr.
Bolcer has a PhD and BS degree in Information and Computer Science from
the University of California, Irvine, and an MS degree from the
University of Southern California.

Sector: networking & communications

TWST: Could we begin with an overview and a summary of Endeavors
Technology?

Dr. Bolcer: Endeavors builds secure collaboration networks on top of
existing Web infrastructure. Its focus is peer-to-peer and we put a Web
application server onto a computing device so that it can work in
conjunction with other computing devices. It's a unique approach for the
next wave Internet and overcomes concerns about how security scalability
and tool integration technologies can be made to work together.
Endeavors works in the collaboration space and its philosophy is to add
one more tier to the Internet infrastructure. Peer-to-peer based Web
infrastructure is the next logical step for the Web to become truly two-
way, writable, and ubiquitous. Today, there are millions of people using
what's called 'Internet scale technologies.' This type of technology is
unique in that no central person controls an Internet scale technology.
Let's examine two examples 'e-mail and Web browsing. Typically, with e-
mail, when a corporation has to add or remove an e-mail account because
somebody comes online or leaves the company, the network administrator
doesn't have to notify every other company, or every other company's
email server that this person has joined or left the company. In the
real world, there's an established user process to cover this
eventuality. If someone sends an e-mail to a dead address, it bounces,
or the e-mail is not received. So, the sender resends the message using
a new address and life goes on.  The same applies to Web browsing. If
you change the location of your home page, or the links on your home
page, you don't have to notify everybody linking to it that you've
changed your address. What happens is that people go to the link to your
page and get what's called 'page not found' or '404' error. You might
have seen these on the Web when viewing sites that contain a 'broken
link.' If this happens, the user usually hits the back button and looks
elsewhere for something that's interesting. This technique of allowing
globally networked, inconsistent data is the same technique used by
Endeavors in its web collaborative software products to scale Web
technologies down to the desktop. The focus of Endeavors' products is to
allow access, search, and publishing of documents and data using
everyday tools that people are already using on their desktops. It works
with Microsoft''s Office tools like Word, PowerPoint' and Excel. There's
also support for tools like Adobe''s GoLive', Illustrator', Photoshop
and Acrobat', as well as common desktop Web applications like Internet
Explorer and Netscape. Endeavors has two offerings: one is for network
collaboration into existing software tools and allows software vendors
to recast the architecture of their software in a peer-to-peer manner.
The second is an end-user application for installation on the desktop,
laptop, or PDA, and allows secure collaborative applications to run on
top of these machines. This allows users to perform secure publishing
across organizations or between businesses, and secure filtered search
across different organizations or groups even if they are in the process
of changing dynamically. Many gurus have made the point that peer-to-
peer technologies is the next generation of the Web. Inevitably, because
of the scale of our global program, Endeavors receives a lot of input
into how we should build tools and technologies for use in an Internet
scale setting. You'll remember when the Web was first catching on, there
was a big technology fight between Lotus Notes and Web technologies.
We've drawn on that experience, our own particular experience with Web
protocols and the techniques already widely adopted, and recreated the
peer-to-peer space as the next generation Web. That's a Web where any
desktop, laptop, PDA, file server, enterprise server can become both a
client and a server. With or without the user's involvement, a peer can
exchange information, provide information, and leverage location and
bandwidth information. Endeavors has developed a set of technologies
that makes sure that interactions are always secure using Web standards
that are used tens of millions of times each day for secure electronic
commerce. Endeavors' approach doesn't interrupt the roadmap that users
need to follow, and it lets them scale their apps through their
firewalls, across organizations, and across business collaboration. I'm
the CTO of Endeavors Technology, and so I have a very technical
background. My background is from a research project at the University
of California, Irvine and it was a DARPA-funded research project out of
the informational technology office. DARPA is an abbreviation for the
Defense Advanced Research Project Agency. Initially, we were a group of
people who had done a lot of the foundational work on World Wide Web
plumbing. The first Web roaming robot came out of the Web software
project at UC Irvine. Almost all of today's search engines are now based
on that work. The concept of Web caching also came out of that lab as
was in part one of today's most widely used Web servers ' the Apache
Software project. About 60% of all public Web pages are now served up by
an Apache server. Other lab projects dealt with extending HTTP, the
underlying protocol of the Web, to optimize transfer, add some new
methods, and to make the Web a writeable medium. These extensions were
designed to allow browsing over Web protocols, open documents in place
across Web protocols, make collections or folders, and to allow search
for files using what's called metadata, which is just data about
specific files. They provided support to read and write data in an
arbitrary way to the Web. Endeavors became the vehicle to take all that
development experience, all the context dealing with all the major
software companies, and transition it to the commercial sector through
companies that were rapidly taking on Web technologies and putting
serious money, effort and training into building programs and
integrations around Web technologies and applications.  Endeavors then
set out to create an infrastructure to extend the Web and provide all
the benefits of having a read-writeable Web server on machines that are
mobile and disconnected, that move around the network, or don't need a
fixed address or centrally controlled name. At the outset, we were three
' Clay Cover, Arthur Hitomi, and myself. Two others then made an early
leap from university to Endeavors ' Peter Kammer and Mark Walters. There
was one other co-founder of the company who now sits on Endeavors'
Advisory Board ' Roy Fielding. We also set up a Technical Advisory Board
made up of some of the major contributors to today's Web standards and
protocols. We started Endeavors to take advantage of our insights into
where the Web was going. In general, people don't realize that the World
Wide Web has been in constant evolution since they first heard of it.
Indeed, it's changed significantly since it first became popularized in
1994, 1995 and 1996. Some tremendous plumbing changes have since been
made to the Web versus most what most people see as the Web ' a Web
browser and a Website. Sure, people can interact with the Web giving
credit card numbers or adding information, but most don't see the Web as
being this ubiquitous, writeable, two-way medium.  The goal of Endeavors
was first and foremost to take its wealth of experience in building the
Web and Web technologies and develop a business that created the next
generation Web. Inevitably, along the way we began looking for our first
customers. They turned out to be mobile knowledge vendors, Tadpole
Technology, which is a listed group on the London Stock Exchange and is
now our parent company.  The Wall Street Transcript knows Tadpole and
its CEO, Bernard Hulme, very well from past interviews. Tadpole became
the perfect customer because of its customer base of field workers. The
technologies being built by Endeavors was also a perfect match for
Tadpole's forward roadmap, so it acquired Endeavors to commercialize our
technologies. Since the acquisition in March 2000, Tadpole has increased
Endeavors' funding several times because peer-to-peer for the business
arena became white hot. We've since created a unique business in the
peer-to-peer space by building a peer-to-peer infrastructure on top of
existing Web protocols as opposed to creating a proprietary protocol.
Clearly, this vision provides significant advantage to all the software
integrators, all the VARs, the people who've been trained for a decade,
and all the Web application developers that have spent nearly $1
trillion or more in the past decade on building Web applications. They
can automatically use all those skills to have access to, and have
collaborative capabilities with all devices that to date were only
clients, or 'second class peers' on the client server Web. Consider
this. If you peer into the organization of a company, and examine where
corporate information is located, you'll find that about 70% of the
freshest data is not located in central document storage, nor in an ERP
or CRM system, or on the app server, file server, or central database.
It's sitting on desktops, laptops and PDAs in and around the company.=20
In fact, the majority of information coming into an enterprise doesn't
come in through central servers. It comes through from what's called the
'edges of the network' ' from people sending email, bringing CDs,
documents and information from trade shows to the work space, people
reading news stories, or being on mail lists and storing data on local
disks.  One of the greatest challenges ahead is to provide secure
access, authoring, publishing, and searching services on the edge of the
network.  If you're recreating all those network services from scratch,
you're going to take five years to figure it out and another five years
to get people to trust those new technologies. If you're creating all
those services that you have anyway on a traditional centralized Web
server, and you're pushing them out to the desktop by scaling them down,
securing them and automating the access control and security mechanisms,
then you already have the infrastructure and the trust.

TWST: What's the client base? Who are you targeting and what are they
demanding as far as the value of the products that you are offering?

Dr. Bolcer: Again, we have two products under our Magi designation. One
is embedding peer-to-peer architecture into a software vendor's existing
products. Every major software vendor, whether it's an infrastructure
play or end-user canned application, all of a sudden has the benefit of
redeploying their software as a network-aware, peer-to-peer application
to any mobile or occasionally disconnected networked computer. Look back
at all the major types of successful networked software used today. It's
remote file access, it's mobile and disconnected, it has searching and
search applications, legacy database integration across organizations,
it's network publishing and collaboration, and it's communication tools
like instant messaging, chat, application sharing, and remote desktop
control, for example. These are the applications that first found
business success when the Web took off and companies are finding
business traction in the peer-to-peer space in the same way they found
traction from the Web. It was those companies that provided Web access,
Web searching, Web publishing and the tools associated with publishing,
and companies that allowed electronic commerce that created value and
found success very quickly. It'll be those same types of embedded
applications or software vendors that will create value very quickly in
the peer-to-peer space. There are even infrastructure vendors like
iPlanetTM, BEA, WebSphere, or even .Net that could take their
application architecture and add another tier to support mobile and
disconnected users, or to support more direct peer-to-peer communication
and collaboration. The other Magi offering is consumer software using
our app as an enterprise end-user. We can turn any software that runs on
a desktop into a network-aware tool without the user changing behavior,
or the software vendor changing the software. That appeals to the
spectrum of desktop software vendors and enterprise end-users. Look at
the top 10 to 40 applications on your desktop and you have a pretty good
indication of what software companies would benefit from adding secure
collaboration networks. Just imagine a group being able to create, share
and edit a budget using Word and Excel in a highly secure manner from
any location, at any time, from any device.

TWST: When you look at the opportunities ahead, do you have the cash and
capital on hand to meet those challenges?

Dr. Bolcer: Yes, we do. In fact, we're happy with our funding, prospects
and progress. Our competitors may not feel the same way. This goes back
to the Notes versus the Web collaboration view of the world. In the more
general peer-to-peer space, the Lotus Notes of peer-to-peer is called
Groove Networks. They've had to build a whole variety of infrastructure
and do a whole variety of back flips technology-wise in order to
accomplish a few of the components and technologies we've bootstrapped
using Web technologies. Groove recently received a large injection of
venture capital from Microsoft Ventures, I believe, on a valuation of
somewhere in the area of $1/4 billion.  Unlike Groove, Endeavors doesn't
have as many programmers and integrators for technical development and
maintenance. So much work and effort over the past decade has already
been executed by Endeavors into integrating Web technologies using a
loosely-coupled, protocol-based integration to the Web versus API-based
integration using specific development libraries. We don't have Groove's
overhead, nor the development cost burden associated with it. From a
development standpoint, we have accomplished much with relatively modest
resources. Moving forward, Endeavors is now busy building the
nondevelopment side of the business including sales, marketing,
alliances and channels.

TWST: What specifically is on the calendar when you look at the next
12-24 months and what will make that time frame a success?

Dr. Bolcer: Endeavors' business model calls first for a set of what we
call marquee customers ' high-profile, highly-visible technology
partners. These partners will address the collaborative software product
market where we embed into their software products and they go after a
particular market segment. I gave an indication earlier of these end-
user applications ' searching, network publishing, and file
collaboration, and all are excellent target markets for Endeavors and
its high-profile business partners. The other part of the business model
will be large-scale deployments mainly through software integrators into
large enterprise customers. That means large numbers of seats deployed
to direct end customers for sharing, editing and acting on information,
network publishing, or for a highly decentralized distributed peer-to-
peer application built on top of the infrastructure at one of these
customers. I believe we're on track to deliver both and hope to be able
to declare victory in the not too distant future.

TWST: Thank you. (DWA)

GREG BOLCER
 CTO
 Endeavors Technology, Inc.
 19700 Fairchild Road
 Suite 200
 Irvine, CA 92612
 (949) 833-2800
 (949) 833-2881 - FAX
 www.endeavors.com
 e-mail: p2p@endeavors.com

Investor relations contact:
 Hugh Paterson
 hughp@patcom-media.com
 For Tadpole Technology plc

Each Executive who is the featured subject of a TWST Interview is
offered the opportunity to include an Investors Brief or other highlight
material to be provided and sponsored by and for the company. This
Interview with Greg Bolcer, CTO of Endeavors Technology, Inc. is
accompanied by an Investors Brief containing corporate information.

Copyright 2001 The Wall Street Transcript Corporation
All Rights Reserved
=1A
      The Wall Street Transcript (TWST) interviews are published =
verbatim, and TWST does not in any way endorse or guarantee the accuracy =
of any information or opinions expressed herein and all opinions are =
subject to change without notice. Nothing herein constitutes a =
solicitation to buy or sell any securities. TWST interviews with CEOs =
may include include "forward-looking statements", which are based on =
factors that involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ =
materially from those expressed or implied. TWST shall have no liability =
whatsoever for any trading losses arising out of use of this =
information. Copyright 1999 Wall Street Transcript Corporation. All =
Rights Reserved.


      =20

Peter

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      <P align=3Dleft><!--#exec cgi=3D"/cgi/pdf.cgi"--><FONT =
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      size=3D4>GREG BOLCER - ENDEAVORS TECHNOLOGY=20
      INC<!--   START TITLE   --></FONT></B> <FONT size=3D3><BR><I><!--  =
 START TYPE   -->CEO Interview - published 12/17/2001<!--   END TYPE   =
--></I></FONT></FONT> <PRE><FONT face=3Darial><!--   START CONTENT   =
-->DOCUMENT # NAR609

GREG BOLCER is a co-founder of Endeavors Technology, Inc. and is
currently its Chief Technology Officer. At Endeavors Technology, Dr.
Bolcer founded the Magi_ project, a lightweight, open protocol, thin
server infrastructure for forming ad hoc, peer-to-peer networks and
accessing embedded systems through standard Web protocols. Prior to co-
founding Endeavors Technology, Dr. Bolcer's research team at UCI
received $4 million in grants from the Defense Advanced Research Project
Agency  non-Sun Microsystems project in the country. He was one of the
key working group participants and co-author for the widely supported
Simple Workflow Access Protocol (SWAP/WF-XML) extensions to HTTP/1.1 and
WebDAV (the Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning Protocol). Dr.
Bolcer has a PhD and BS degree in Information and Computer Science from
the University of California, Irvine, and an MS degree from the
University of Southern California.

Sector: networking &amp; communications

<B>TWST: Could we begin with an overview and a summary of Endeavors
Technology?</B>

Dr. Bolcer: Endeavors builds secure collaboration networks on top of
existing Web infrastructure. Its focus is peer-to-peer and we put a Web
application server onto a computing device so that it can work in
conjunction with other computing devices. It's a unique approach for the
next wave Internet and overcomes concerns about how security scalability
and tool integration technologies can be made to work together.
Endeavors works in the collaboration space and its philosophy is to add
one more tier to the Internet infrastructure. Peer-to-peer based Web
infrastructure is the next logical step for the Web to become truly two-
way, writable, and ubiquitous. Today, there are millions of people using
what's called 'Internet scale technologies.' This type of technology is
unique in that no central person controls an Internet scale technology.
Let's examine two examples 'e-mail and Web browsing. Typically, with e-
mail, when a corporation has to add or remove an e-mail account because
somebody comes online or leaves the company, the network administrator
doesn't have to notify every other company, or every other company's
email server that this person has joined or left the company. In the
real world, there's an established user process to cover this
eventuality. If someone sends an e-mail to a dead address, it bounces,
or the e-mail is not received. So, the sender resends the message using
a new address and life goes on.  The same applies to Web browsing. If
you change the location of your home page, or the links on your home
page, you don't have to notify everybody linking to it that you've
changed your address. What happens is that people go to the link to your
page and get what's called 'page not found' or '404' error. You might
have seen these on the Web when viewing sites that contain a 'broken
link.' If this happens, the user usually hits the back button and looks
elsewhere for something that's interesting. This technique of allowing
globally networked, inconsistent data is the same technique used by
Endeavors in its web collaborative software products to scale Web
technologies down to the desktop. The focus of Endeavors' products is to
allow access, search, and publishing of documents and data using
everyday tools that people are already using on their desktops. It works
with Microsoft''s Office tools like Word, PowerPoint' and Excel. There's
also support for tools like Adobe''s GoLive', Illustrator', Photoshop
and Acrobat', as well as common desktop Web applications like Internet
Explorer and Netscape. Endeavors has two offerings: one is for network
collaboration into existing software tools and allows software vendors
to recast the architecture of their software in a peer-to-peer manner.
The second is an end-user application for installation on the desktop,
laptop, or PDA, and allows secure collaborative applications to run on
top of these machines. This allows users to perform secure publishing
across organizations or between businesses, and secure filtered search
across different organizations or groups even if they are in the process
of changing dynamically. Many gurus have made the point that peer-to-
peer technologies is the next generation of the Web. Inevitably, because
of the scale of our global program, Endeavors receives a lot of input
into how we should build tools and technologies for use in an Internet
scale setting. You'll remember when the Web was first catching on, there
was a big technology fight between Lotus Notes and Web technologies.
We've drawn on that experience, our own particular experience with Web
protocols and the techniques already widely adopted, and recreated the
peer-to-peer space as the next generation Web. That's a Web where any
desktop, laptop, PDA, file server, enterprise server can become both a
client and a server. With or without the user's involvement, a peer can
exchange information, provide information, and leverage location and
bandwidth information. Endeavors has developed a set of technologies
that makes sure that interactions are always secure using Web standards
that are used tens of millions of times each day for secure electronic
commerce. Endeavors' approach doesn't interrupt the roadmap that users
need to follow, and it lets them scale their apps through their
firewalls, across organizations, and across business collaboration. I'm
the CTO of Endeavors Technology, and so I have a very technical
background. My background is from a research project at the University
of California, Irvine and it was a DARPA-funded research project out of
the informational technology office. DARPA is an abbreviation for the
Defense Advanced Research Project Agency. Initially, we were a group of
people who had done a lot of the foundational work on World Wide Web
plumbing. The first Web roaming robot came out of the Web software
project at UC Irvine. Almost all of today's search engines are now based
on that work. The concept of Web caching also came out of that lab as
was in part one of today's most widely used Web servers ' the Apache
Software project. About 60% of all public Web pages are now served up by
an Apache server. Other lab projects dealt with extending HTTP, the
underlying protocol of the Web, to optimize transfer, add some new
methods, and to make the Web a writeable medium. These extensions were
designed to allow browsing over Web protocols, open documents in place
across Web protocols, make collections or folders, and to allow search
for files using what's called metadata, which is just data about
specific files. They provided support to read and write data in an
arbitrary way to the Web. Endeavors became the vehicle to take all that
development experience, all the context dealing with all the major
software companies, and transition it to the commercial sector through
companies that were rapidly taking on Web technologies and putting
serious money, effort and training into building programs and
integrations around Web technologies and applications.  Endeavors then
set out to create an infrastructure to extend the Web and provide all
the benefits of having a read-writeable Web server on machines that are
mobile and disconnected, that move around the network, or don't need a
fixed address or centrally controlled name. At the outset, we were three
' Clay Cover, Arthur Hitomi, and myself. Two others then made an early
leap from university to Endeavors ' Peter Kammer and Mark Walters. There
was one other co-founder of the company who now sits on Endeavors'
Advisory Board ' Roy Fielding. We also set up a Technical Advisory Board
made up of some of the major contributors to today's Web standards and
protocols. We started Endeavors to take advantage of our insights into
where the Web was going. In general, people don't realize that the World
Wide Web has been in constant evolution since they first heard of it.
Indeed, it's changed significantly since it first became popularized in
1994, 1995 and 1996. Some tremendous plumbing changes have since been
made to the Web versus most what most people see as the Web ' a Web
browser and a Website. Sure, people can interact with the Web giving
credit card numbers or adding information, but most don't see the Web as
being this ubiquitous, writeable, two-way medium.  The goal of Endeavors
was first and foremost to take its wealth of experience in building the
Web and Web technologies and develop a business that created the next
generation Web. Inevitably, along the way we began looking for our first
customers. They turned out to be mobile knowledge vendors, Tadpole
Technology, which is a listed group on the London Stock Exchange and is
now our parent company.  The Wall Street Transcript knows Tadpole and
its CEO, Bernard Hulme, very well from past interviews. Tadpole became
the perfect customer because of its customer base of field workers. The
technologies being built by Endeavors was also a perfect match for
Tadpole's forward roadmap, so it acquired Endeavors to commercialize our
technologies. Since the acquisition in March 2000, Tadpole has increased
Endeavors' funding several times because peer-to-peer for the business
arena became white hot. We've since created a unique business in the
peer-to-peer space by building a peer-to-peer infrastructure on top of
existing Web protocols as opposed to creating a proprietary protocol.
Clearly, this vision provides significant advantage to all the software
integrators, all the VARs, the people who've been trained for a decade,
and all the Web application developers that have spent nearly $1
trillion or more in the past decade on building Web applications. They
can automatically use all those skills to have access to, and have
collaborative capabilities with all devices that to date were only
clients, or 'second class peers' on the client server Web. Consider
this. If you peer into the organization of a company, and examine where
corporate information is located, you'll find that about 70% of the
freshest data is not located in central document storage, nor in an ERP
or CRM system, or on the app server, file server, or central database.
It's sitting on desktops, laptops and PDAs in and around the company.=20
In fact, the majority of information coming into an enterprise doesn't
come in through central servers. It comes through from what's called the
'edges of the network' ' from people sending email, bringing CDs,
documents and information from trade shows to the work space, people
reading news stories, or being on mail lists and storing data on local
disks.  One of the greatest challenges ahead is to provide secure
access, authoring, publishing, and searching services on the edge of the
network.  If you're recreating all those network services from scratch,
you're going to take five years to figure it out and another five years
to get people to trust those new technologies. If you're creating all
those services that you have anyway on a traditional centralized Web
server, and you're pushing them out to the desktop by scaling them down,
securing them and automating the access control and security mechanisms,
then you already have the infrastructure and the trust.

<B>TWST: What's the client base? Who are you targeting and what are they
demanding as far as the value of the products that you are offering?</B>

Dr. Bolcer: Again, we have two products under our Magi designation. One
is embedding peer-to-peer architecture into a software vendor's existing
products. Every major software vendor, whether it's an infrastructure
play or end-user canned application, all of a sudden has the benefit of
redeploying their software as a network-aware, peer-to-peer application
to any mobile or occasionally disconnected networked computer. Look back
at all the major types of successful networked software used today. It's
remote file access, it's mobile and disconnected, it has searching and
search applications, legacy database integration across organizations,
it's network publishing and collaboration, and it's communication tools
like instant messaging, chat, application sharing, and remote desktop
control, for example. These are the applications that first found
business success when the Web took off and companies are finding
business traction in the peer-to-peer space in the same way they found
traction from the Web. It was those companies that provided Web access,
Web searching, Web publishing and the tools associated with publishing,
and companies that allowed electronic commerce that created value and
found success very quickly. It'll be those same types of embedded
applications or software vendors that will create value very quickly in
the peer-to-peer space. There are even infrastructure vendors like
iPlanetTM, BEA, WebSphere, or even .Net that could take their
application architecture and add another tier to support mobile and
disconnected users, or to support more direct peer-to-peer communication
and collaboration. The other Magi offering is consumer software using
our app as an enterprise end-user. We can turn any software that runs on
a desktop into a network-aware tool without the user changing behavior,
or the software vendor changing the software. That appeals to the
spectrum of desktop software vendors and enterprise end-users. Look at
the top 10 to 40 applications on your desktop and you have a pretty good
indication of what software companies would benefit from adding secure
collaboration networks. Just imagine a group being able to create, share
and edit a budget using Word and Excel in a highly secure manner from
any location, at any time, from any device.

<B>TWST: When you look at the opportunities ahead, do you have the cash =
and
capital on hand to meet those challenges?</B>

Dr. Bolcer: Yes, we do. In fact, we're happy with our funding, prospects
and progress. Our competitors may not feel the same way. This goes back
to the Notes versus the Web collaboration view of the world. In the more
general peer-to-peer space, the Lotus Notes of peer-to-peer is called
Groove Networks. They've had to build a whole variety of infrastructure
and do a whole variety of back flips technology-wise in order to
accomplish a few of the components and technologies we've bootstrapped
using Web technologies. Groove recently received a large injection of
venture capital from Microsoft Ventures, I believe, on a valuation of
somewhere in the area of $1/4 billion.  Unlike Groove, Endeavors doesn't
have as many programmers and integrators for technical development and
maintenance. So much work and effort over the past decade has already
been executed by Endeavors into integrating Web technologies using a
loosely-coupled, protocol-based integration to the Web versus API-based
integration using specific development libraries. We don't have Groove's
overhead, nor the development cost burden associated with it. From a
development standpoint, we have accomplished much with relatively modest
resources. Moving forward, Endeavors is now busy building the
nondevelopment side of the business including sales, marketing,
alliances and channels.

<B>TWST: What specifically is on the calendar when you look at the next
12-24 months and what will make that time frame a success?</B>

Dr. Bolcer: Endeavors' business model calls first for a set of what we
call marquee customers ' high-profile, highly-visible technology
partners. These partners will address the collaborative software product
market where we embed into their software products and they go after a
particular market segment. I gave an indication earlier of these end-
user applications ' searching, network publishing, and file
collaboration, and all are excellent target markets for Endeavors and
its high-profile business partners. The other part of the business model
will be large-scale deployments mainly through software integrators into
large enterprise customers. That means large numbers of seats deployed
to direct end customers for sharing, editing and acting on information,
network publishing, or for a highly decentralized distributed peer-to-
peer application built on top of the infrastructure at one of these
customers. I believe we're on track to deliver both and hope to be able
to declare victory in the not too distant future.

<B>TWST: Thank you. (DWA)</B>

GREG BOLCER
 CTO
 Endeavors Technology, Inc.
 19700 Fairchild Road
 Suite 200
 Irvine, CA 92612
 (949) 833-2800
 (949) 833-2881 - FAX
 www.endeavors.com
 e-mail: p2p@endeavors.com

Investor relations contact:
 Hugh Paterson
 hughp@patcom-media.com
 For Tadpole Technology plc

Each Executive who is the featured subject of a TWST Interview is
offered the opportunity to include an Investors Brief or other highlight
material to be provided and sponsored by and for the company. This
Interview with Greg Bolcer, CTO of Endeavors Technology, Inc. is
accompanied by an Investors Brief containing corporate information.

Copyright 2001 The Wall Street Transcript Corporation
All Rights Reserved
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