NYTimes.com Article: U.S. Warning of Death Toll From Obesity

Dave Long dl@silcom.com
Wed, 19 Dec 2001 10:31:10 -0800


> WASHINGTON, Dec. 13 - Some 300,000 Americans a year die
> from illnesses caused or worsened by obesity ...

If tobacco at 430,000 causes or
worsens 20% of deaths, then that
obesity figure would be about 14%.

according to <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/lcod.htm>:

Ten Leading Causes of Death in the U.S.: (1998)
Heart Disease:                                   724,859
Cancer: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  541,532
Stroke:                                          158,448
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease:  . . . .  112,584
Accidents:                                        97,835
Pneumonia/Influenza:  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   91,871
Diabetes:                                         64,751
Suicide:  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   30,575
Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis:     26,182
Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis:  . . . . .   25,192

So both look fairly significant,
especially when compared with the
rate of accidental deaths.  (Does
anyone have data on heart disease
and cancer in fit non-smokers?)

::::::::

> >Losing even 10 pounds can reduce the risk of getting
> >diabetes or heart disease, Dr. Satcher said, as can simply
> >walking 30 minutes a day.
>
> Perhaps cities that create a transportation infrastructure
> that makes it difficult or dangerous to walk or bike carry
> as much of the blame as -- maybe more than -- the fast
> food restaurants?

Well, as one of the remaining three
who might join you for a palazzo on
Piazza San Marco, I found the irony
noted below amusing:

> Thanks for telling me about "How Buildings Learn" (Stewart Brand) and
> "A Pattern Language" (Christopher Alexander).  ...
> One of the remarkable things is that Alexander's ideal community, with
> housing over streetside business, so kids can watch the shoemaker at
> work, and with cows and privies not far away, is exactly what his grandfather
> left Poland to get away from.

Did our grandfathers want plenty to
eat and not too much manual labor?
(if one is moving *to* something,
it is easier to tell when to stop
than when one moves *away from*)

-Dave

People who are too busy to get out
for a half hour's hack are saving
themselves maybe 15,000 hours over
a lifetime.  What is the breakeven
in years of additional health? Two
or three?