Fwd: SiliconIndia: #23/25 Hot Startups

Rohit Khare Rohit@KnowNow.com
Fri, 5 Oct 2001 17:53:49 -0700


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http://www.siliconindia.com/magazine/displaydetail007.asp
(password required)

At 5:49 PM -0700 10/5/01, Rohit Khare wrote:
>23. KnowNow
>Founded: April 2000 by Rohit Khare, CTO, Adam Rifkin
>Funding: $8.5 million (KPCB, Palomar Ventures)
>www.knownow.com
>Another Vinod Khosla funded "real time enterprise" play, this 
>startup, founded by graduate students Rohit Khare and Adam Rifkin, 
>has developed an event router that acts to keep a continuous 
>connection open between an Internet browsers and the server, and a 
>JavaScript-based mini-server to operate at the client end.
>
>This enables real-time communications over the Internet without the 
>need for users to download plug-ins or perform any installation. So 
>Web developers can use KnowNow technology to deliver instant updates 
>to users' browsers without them having to initiate a request. Not 
>only that, but users can now "publish" updates to other users 
>subscribing to the same information instantly now that their 
>browsers can act as mini-servers. The ultimate idea is to provide 
>greater visibility into systems and the supply chain for businesses 
>using enterprise applications.
>
>It's a compelling technology and could be the next generation of 
>Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) technology - replacing 
>solutions currently offered by heavyweights like BEA and Tibco.


October 2001 - Cover story --
siliconindia Cool 25[But Will They Be Hot?]  
By Yogesh Sharma
Top 25 startups in the United States. Find out more about them.

It's a brutal time to be an entrepreneur. It's also a time when 
journalists like us need to look back and reflect on how we fueled 
the fire that inflated the tech bubble. Clearly, the hype got out of 
hand, and some of the technologies and companies that we touted as 
the next big thing have faltered very badly. These are more realistic 
times.

But we are going against the current climate of bad news and lack of 
confidence in the high-tech industry, and feature 25 promising 
Indian-founded tech startups - the "siliconindia Cool 25."

Why?

As we put together our si100 list last month, we decided to omit 
early stage companies that haven't yet shown significant revenues, 
and only include more seasoned firms. But early stage startups are 
important companies to feature, and we want to give them their due. 
The best venture investors are still out there looking to make things 
happen, and yes, the great companies of tomorrow are being formed as 
we speak.

It's questionable that even marquee VC investors will be able to 
deliver on the promise of their billion dollar war chests. But nobody 
would deny that the VC funding process, and the regenerative startup 
culture of the tech industry is a fundamentally healthy thing - even 
if with every up-cycle the hype gets a little out of hand.

The companies we have featured were picked subjectively, taking into 
account the quality of the founders and investors, the market 
landscape that each company hopes to thrive in, the business 
fundamentals of the idea itself as well as the company's ability to 
execute thus far.

Many of the companies featured are very early stage, and not all will 
survive the market, but we encourage you to remember these names, as 
we are confident that at least some will survive, thrive and grow 
into the success stories of tomorrow.

Fighting through the crowded mess in the networking sector is looking 
harder and harder. Some companies think they can still make carriers, 
data centers and enterprises buy their stuff.

1. Abeona Networks
Founded: December of 1999 by Vaibhav Malawade, CEO
Funding: $13 Million (Sequoia, KPCB)
www.abeona.com
Abeona's profile is pretty enviable - with sage Sequoia Capital 
partner Pierre Lamond, and Vinod Khosla both taking seats on the 
board. Founder and CEO Vaibhav Malawade recalls taking his plan to 
Sequoia and KPCB. Pretty soon the team had a term sheet from Sequoia. 
Khosla was going on vacation, but soon got back and asked for a week 
to do his due diligence. Sequoia was kept waiting for a few days, and 
both firms got in on the deal.

Abeona is just emerging out of stealth mode. The company's product 
is, as new technology goes, pretty easy to grasp.

The idea is to go into burgeoning Internet data centers and find a 
much more efficient way to do things, using a combination of both 
server and networking technology. As it is, the data center world, 
between servers and the firewall, is a tangled mess of web servers, 
server load balancers, cache, and security products. Abeona wants to 
change that, with a box that can, if needed replace all of these 
disparate elements and augment server performance and capacity 
tenfold.

The system translates into reduced operational and infrastructure 
costs for customers, and that's music to the ears of CIOs struggling 
to manage growing data requirements on tighter budgets at target 
clients like financial services companies, and even large e-tailers 
like Amazon.

It's an ambitious venture. Abeona's current box can plug and play 
into existing systems to simply improve server performance, or it can 
be used in green-field operations. Khosla apparently expects the 
company to have a billion dollar run rate in four years. For now, the 
first customers are just signing up. These guys have big plans. Now 
they need to sell boxes - lots of them - to live up to the buzz.

...

6. Zambeel
Founded: September 1999, by Dr Waheed Qureshi, CTO, Sid Agrawal, 
Chief Zambeelian
Funding: $26.5 million (KPCB, NEA)
www.zambeel.com
According to CEO Darren Thomas, formerly an exec with storage 
heavyweight Compaq, Zambeel offers "a storage solution that is 
completely lights out." That's typical vague stealth mode language. 
What Thomas and founder Sid Agrawal can communicate is that Zambeel 
is addressing the problem of storage management.

The Zambeel architecture can apparently take off-the-shelf components 
and provide a solution that completely automates manageability. "You 
turn this machine on, if it has a failure it replaces the part," 
Thomas says. "When an employee reaches 80 percent of his capacity it 
can automatically give him another five gigs." The system is supposed 
to cut down on high personnel and management costs in traditional 
solutions.
...
15. Centrata
Founded: 2000 by David Ratajczak, Boris Pevzner, and Shishir Mehrotra
Funding: KPCB, Dot Edu Ventures, Invesco, Presidio Venture Partners 
www.centrata.com
Centrata is an application infrastructure provider creating product 
solutions for next-generation datacenters - pretty vague. David 
Ratajczak, Boris Pevzner, and Shishir Mehrotra, all in their 20's, 
founded the company.

The buzz comes from Vinod Khosla's personal involvement with the 
company. Centrata is currently in the stealthiest of stealth modes.

The pressure's on for a repeat performance for the founders and 
executives of the next three networking companies, since all three 
saw blockbuster entrepreneurial success during the boom. Can they 
deliver a second time?
...
23. KnowNow
Founded: April 2000 by Rohit Khare, CTO, Adam Rifkin
Funding: $8.5 million (KPCB, Palomar Ventures)
www.knownow.com
Another Vinod Khosla funded "real time enterprise" play, this 
startup, founded by graduate students Rohit Khare and Adam Rifkin, 
has developed an event router that acts to keep a continuous 
connection open between an Internet browsers and the server, and a 
JavaScript-based mini-server to operate at the client end.

This enables real-time communications over the Internet without the 
need for users to download plug-ins or perform any installation. So 
Web developers can use KnowNow technology to deliver instant updates 
to users' browsers without them having to initiate a request. Not 
only that, but users can now "publish" updates to other users 
subscribing to the same information instantly now that their browsers 
can act as mini-servers. The ultimate idea is to provide greater 
visibility into systems and the supply chain for businesses using 
enterprise applications.

It's a compelling technology and could be the next generation of 
Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) technology - replacing 
solutions currently offered by heavyweights like BEA and Tibco.
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<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>Fwd: SiliconIndia: #23/25 Hot
Startups</title></head><body>
<div>http://www.siliconindia.com/magazine/displaydetail007.asp</div>
<div>(password required)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>At 5:49 PM -0700 10/5/01, Rohit Khare wrote:</div>
<blockquote type="cite" cite><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1"
color="#000000">23. KnowNow<br>
Founded: April 2000 by Rohit Khare, CTO, Adam Rifkin<br>
Funding: $8.5 million (KPCB, Palomar Ventures)<br>
www.knownow.com<br>
Another Vinod Khosla funded &quot;real time enterprise&quot; play,
this startup, founded by graduate students Rohit Khare and Adam
Rifkin, has developed an event router that acts to keep a continuous
connection open between an Internet browsers and the server, and a
JavaScript-based mini-server to operate at the client end.<br>
<br>
This enables real-time communications over the Internet without the
need for users to download plug-ins or perform any installation. So
Web developers can use KnowNow technology to deliver instant updates
to users' browsers without them having to initiate a request. Not only
that, but users can now &quot;publish&quot; updates to other users
subscribing to the same information instantly now that their browsers
can act as mini-servers. The ultimate idea is to provide greater
visibility into systems and the supply chain for businesses using
enterprise applications.<br>
<br>
It's a compelling technology and could be the next generation of
Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) technology - replacing
solutions currently offered by heavyweights like BEA and
Tibco.</font></blockquote>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1"
color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1"
color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">October
2001 - Cover story --</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" size="+3" color="#CF913D"><b>siliconindia Cool
25[But Will They Be Hot?]</b></font><font face="Arial" size="+1"
color="#000000"><b>&nbsp;</b></font><font face="Times New Roman"
size="-3" color="#FF0000"><b>&nbsp;</b></font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" size="-3"
color="#CC3300"><b>By</b></font><font face="Arial" size="-3"
color="#CC0000"><u> Yogesh Sharma</u></font><font
face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"><br>
</font><font face="Arial" size="+1" color="#000000">Top 25 startups in
the United States. Find out more about them.</font><font
face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"><br>
<br>
It's a brutal time to be an entrepreneur. It's also a time when
journalists like us need to look back and reflect on how we fueled the
fire that inflated the tech bubble. Clearly, the hype got out of hand,
and some of the technologies and companies that we touted as the next
big thing have faltered very badly. These are more realistic
times.<br>
<br>
But we are going against the current climate of bad news and lack of
confidence in the high-tech industry, and feature 25 promising
Indian-founded tech startups - the "siliconindia Cool 25."<br>
<br>
Why?<br>
<br>
As we put together our si100 list last month, we decided to omit early
stage companies that haven't yet shown significant revenues, and
only include more seasoned firms. But early stage startups are
important companies to feature, and we want to give them their due.
The best venture investors are still out there looking to make things
happen, and yes, the great companies of tomorrow are being formed as
we speak.<br>
<br>
It's questionable that even marquee VC investors will be able to
deliver on the promise of their billion dollar war chests. But nobody
would deny that the VC funding process, and the regenerative startup
culture of the tech industry is a fundamentally healthy thing - even
if with every up-cycle the hype gets a little out of hand.<br>
<br>
The companies we have featured were picked subjectively, taking into
account the quality of the founders and investors, the market
landscape that each company hopes to thrive in, the business
fundamentals of the idea itself as well as the company's ability to
execute thus far.<br>
<br>
Many of the companies featured are very early stage, and not all will
survive the market, but we encourage you to remember these names, as
we are confident that at least some will survive, thrive and grow into
the success stories of tomorrow.<br>
<br>
Fighting through the crowded mess in the networking sector is looking
harder and harder. Some companies think they can still make carriers,
data centers and enterprises buy their stuff.</font><br>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">1. Abeona
Networks<br>
Founded: December of 1999 by Vaibhav Malawade, CEO<br>
Funding: $13 Million (Sequoia, KPCB)<br>
www.abeona.com<br>
Abeona's profile is pretty enviable - with sage Sequoia Capital
partner Pierre Lamond, and Vinod Khosla both taking seats on the
board. Founder and CEO Vaibhav Malawade recalls taking his plan to
Sequoia and KPCB. Pretty soon the team had a term sheet from Sequoia.
Khosla was going on vacation, but soon got back and asked for a week
to do his due diligence. Sequoia was kept waiting for a few days, and
both firms got in on the deal.</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"><br>
Abeona is just emerging out of stealth mode. The company's product
is, as new technology goes, pretty easy to grasp.<br>
<br>
The idea is to go into burgeoning Internet data centers and find a
much more efficient way to do things, using a combination of both
server and networking technology. As it is, the data center world,
between servers and the firewall, is a tangled mess of web servers,
server load balancers, cache, and security products. Abeona wants to
change that, with a box that can, if needed replace all of these
disparate elements and augment server performance and capacity
tenfold.<br>
<br>
The system translates into reduced operational and infrastructure
costs for customers, and that's music to the ears of CIOs struggling
to manage growing data requirements on tighter budgets at target
clients like financial services companies, and even large e-tailers
like Amazon.</font><br>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">It's an
ambitious venture. Abeona's current box can plug and play into
existing systems to simply improve server performance, or it can be
used in green-field operations. Khosla apparently expects the company
to have a billion dollar run rate in four years. For now, the first
customers are just signing up. These guys have big plans. Now they
need to sell boxes - lots of them - to live up to the
buzz.</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1"
color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1"
color="#000000">...</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"><br>
6. Zambeel<br>
Founded: September 1999, by Dr Waheed Qureshi, CTO, Sid Agrawal, Chief
Zambeelian<br>
Funding: $26.5 million (KPCB, NEA)<br>
www.zambeel.com<br>
According to CEO Darren Thomas, formerly an exec with storage
heavyweight Compaq, Zambeel offers "a storage solution that is
completely lights out." That's typical vague stealth mode
language. What Thomas and founder Sid Agrawal can communicate is that
Zambeel is addressing the problem of storage management.</font><br>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">The
Zambeel architecture can apparently take off-the-shelf components and
provide a solution that completely automates manageability. "You
turn this machine on, if it has a failure it replaces the part,"
Thomas says. "When an employee reaches 80 percent of his capacity it
can automatically give him another five gigs." The system is
supposed to cut down on high personnel and management costs in
traditional solutions.</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">...<br>
15. Centrata<br>
Founded: 2000 by David Ratajczak, Boris Pevzner, and Shishir
Mehrotra<br>
Funding: KPCB, Dot Edu Ventures, Invesco, Presidio Venture Partners
www.centrata.com<br>
Centrata is an application infrastructure provider creating product
solutions for next-generation datacenters - pretty vague. David
Ratajczak, Boris Pevzner, and Shishir Mehrotra, all in their 20's,
founded the company.<br>
<br>
The buzz comes from Vinod Khosla's personal involvement with the
company. Centrata is currently in the stealthiest of stealth
modes.</font><br>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">The
pressure's on for a repeat performance for the founders and
executives of the next three networking companies, since all three saw
blockbuster entrepreneurial success during the boom. Can they deliver
a second time?</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">...<br>
23. KnowNow<br>
Founded: April 2000 by Rohit Khare, CTO, Adam Rifkin<br>
Funding: $8.5 million (KPCB, Palomar Ventures)<br>
www.knownow.com<br>
Another Vinod Khosla funded &quot;real time enterprise&quot; play,
this startup, founded by graduate students Rohit Khare and Adam
Rifkin, has developed an event router that acts to keep a continuous
connection open between an Internet browsers and the server, and a
JavaScript-based mini-server to operate at the client
end.</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"><br>
This enables real-time communications over the Internet without the
need for users to download plug-ins or perform any installation. So
Web developers can use KnowNow technology to deliver instant updates
to users' browsers without them having to initiate a request. Not only
that, but users can now &quot;publish&quot; updates to other users
subscribing to the same information instantly now that their browsers
can act as mini-servers. The ultimate idea is to provide greater
visibility into systems and the supply chain for businesses using
enterprise applications.</font><br>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">It's a
compelling technology and could be the next generation of Enterprise
Application Integration (EAI) technology - replacing solutions
currently offered by heavyweights like BEA and Tibco.</font></div>
</body>
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