Worried about mosquito vectored hemorrhagic fever?

Reese reeza@flex.com
Thu, 11 Oct 2001 21:08:12 -1000


At 08:47 AM 10/10/01 -0500, Russell Turpin wrote:
 >Don't travel here:
 >
 >http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/conditions/10/09/hawaii.dengue.ap/index.html
 >
 >Carolyn and I will take your pre-purchased tickets and
 >beach cabin.

Will you take over my job so I can leave?  ;)

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DENGUE - USA (HAWAII) (04)
**************************
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[see also:
Dengue - USA (Hawaii) 20010922.2296
Dengue - USA (Hawaii) (02) 20010926.2348
Dengue - USA (Hawaii) (03) 20010928.2371
Dengue/DHF updates (13): 4 Oct 2001 20011004.2410]

Date: 5 Oct 2001
From: David Duffy <dduffy@hawaii.edu>
Source: Honolulu Advertiser, Fri 5 Oct 2001 [edited]


Spread of Dengue Fever Not Yet Contained
----------------------------------------
State Health Director Bruce Anderson said yesterday that dengue fever is 
established on O'ahu and could infect everyone in Hawai'i, causing serious 
illness for 200 000 people unless mosquitoes are controlled. Anderson's 
assessment, which he described as a worst case scenario, stood in stark 
contrast to Gov. Ben Cayetano's statement only one day earlier that the
virus had been contained in East Maui and would not spread statewide.
Hawai'i "will throw everything we have at it," and every citizen of the
state can help, Anderson said. But few other countries or communities 
worldwide have been able to stop dengue fever from running its course.
Without DDT and the other powerful and toxic pesticides of the past, dengue
fever usually stops only when the virus has been transmitted to most of the
population, exposing about 20 percent to serious illness, but conferring
immunity [to] that strain of dengue in the future, Anderson said.

Anderson stated that the virus appears to have been introduced
independently on Maui, Kaua'i and O'ahu rather than spread inter-island,
and has come to Hawai'i primarily from places like American Samoa, Tahiti
and other parts of Polynesia where it is already epidemic. Surfers who
visited Tahiti are believed responsible for bringing dengue fever to
Anahola on Kaua'i. A hula halau from Hana that visited Tahiti in the summer
returned to East Maui with many members very ill and probably had
contributed to the establishment of the virus in that area, Anderson said.
The exact means of the arrival of the virus on O'ahu isn't known, but
frequent travel to foreign countries and passage through Hawai'i by many
people from foreign countries, are likely means of transmission, Anderson
said. He added that 4 more suspected cases of dengue have been identified
on O'ahu in the past 24 hours, bringing the total number of suspected cases
to 8. One case had been confirmed by tests at the federal Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. A new case is suspected in Manoa, another
in Kane'ohe (the second in that area so far), and a third in Wahiawa.
Mosquito abatement specialists immediately visited the homes of these cases
and sprayed insecticides 200 feet in every direction. Prior suspected O'ahu
cases were in Kane'ohe, Waikele and La'ie, and one case from Ka'a'awa has
been confirmed. It may become necessary to consider neighborhood or
regional mosquito ground spraying on O'ahu, similar to the spraying of all
of Hana town and all of lower Nahiku on Maui, Anderson said. A fourth new
suspected case on O'ahu involved a patient treated at Tripler Army Medical
Center.

Anderson stated that 8 new suspected cases have been reported on Maui
within the past 24 hours, although some of the people involved may no
longer be infectious. The health director said he met yesterday with Mayor
Jeremy Harris to coordinate a countywide effort to remove potential
mosquito breeding places, such as old tires and other items which could
contain standing water, especially near private residences and businesses.
Similar efforts are about to be announced on Maui and Kaua'i, he said. The
Maui cases confirmed either by CDC or preliminary screening tests came from
Ha'iku (3), the Hana area (22), Lahaina (1) and Wailuku (2). More Maui
cases involving clinical signs of dengue fever, but not yet confirmed by
lab tests, were found in the following communities: Ha'iku (9), Hali'imaile
(1), Hana area (40), Huelo (2), Kahului (2), Kihei (7), Kula (1), Lahaina
(4), Makawao (1), Pukalani (3) and Wailuku (9). Kaua'i has one confirmed
case in Anahola and one clinical case in Kalaheo. The Big Island has
clinically identified cases in Hilo (1), Kailua, Kona (2) and Mountain View
(1).

[Byline: Walter Wright]

--
David Cameron Duffy
Professor of Botany and Unit Leader
Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU)
U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service and
University of Hawaii
<dduffy@hawaii.edu>
.........................cp/ds

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