Three Women Pregnant With Cloned Babies

Paul Prescod paul@prescod.net
Wed, 24 Apr 2002 23:12:37 -0700


Gordon Mohr wrote:
> 
>....
> 
> When those two anti- views are combined, and placed alongside the
> reality of women pregnant with cloned fetuses, I expect the most
> fervent combined anti-abortion/anti-cloning types to face a
> quandary that might result in some interesting intellectual
> contortions.

I don't. I expect that their respect for life will vastly outstrip their
dislike of our "playing god".

> I'm still not sure that we've seen the views of anyone who
> adamently believes that both abortion and cloning should be banned.
> Does that combination capture your beliefs?

No. I am essentially ambivalent about both practices. I would not want
to participate in an abortion but I wouldn't make the provision of them
illegal.

> I'm still eager to see some prominent (public figures) agitators
> against these two procedures explain what they'd like to do with
> viable clone fetuses. Perhaps they will say that the cloned fetuses
> have a right to life, and should be accepted as full, valuable
> human lives no matter what. That would certainly be a reasonable
> position.

That's what I expect.

> But if they do say that, and the mother/donors/doctor/etc. all
> think the cloning was a good idea, what's the rationale for
> banning cloning, or punishing those involved in the process? If
> cloning just creates wonderful human beings deserving of love,
> who's the victim, and what's the principle being harmed by allowing
> them?

God is the victim. Many of these people are the same people who think
that masturbation is immoral and a crime against God. And let's not
forget contraception. Looking for human victims is not a high priority!

> "Love the clone, hate the cloning" is a tricky position.

I don't see anything tricky about it at all.

> Further, the strength of anti-abortion fervor has in the past
> moved some fringe/extreme types to actual murder. Anti-clone fervor
> seems of nearly the same strength, and often the same theological
> derivation.

I don't think that the passion will be of the same strength and I think
that the clone will be perceived as a victim, not a criminal. How often
do these fringe types kill the women who had abortions? They kill the
doctors because in their minds the doctors are engaging in a kind of
mass murder and killing the doctor is a way of stopping it. It's the
old: "would you kill Hitler" question. That doesn't apply to a clone.

>...
> I suspect the same sort of anti-abortion folks who think some
> abortions are justified might find clone abortions justified,
> maybe even desirable.

I'll repeat that IMO, *very few* really deeply committed anti-abortion
people think that some abortions are justified. I'd be surprised to hear
that that is the position of any large church or abortion group.

Yes, there are millions of wishy washy anti-abortionists who think that
some abortions are justified, but they aren't the type to go around
advocating death to anybody.

I suppose if someone was hardline on cloning but soft on abortion then
they might have a decision to make but that person would be a rare
psycho, not a recognizable social phenomenon.

> I suspect the sort of fervent anti-cloning folks who would
> typically be against abortion might make an exception for
> clones.

I think time will prove you wrong.

> The ways that people reconcile clashes between absolutes are
> very interesting!
> 
> - Gordon
> 
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