Werbach in Slate on back-to-1995: B2C is back!

Elias Sinderson elias@cse.ucsc.edu
Tue, 07 Jan 2003 14:29:42 -0800


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Hehe, ever wonder just how they (google) do it? the following is FoRKed 
from http://www.google.com/technology/pigeonrank.html - sorry about te 
html email.

E
____________________________________________

The technology behind Google's great results

As a Google user, you're familiar with the speed and accuracy of a 
Google search. How exactly does Google manage to find the right results 
for every query as quickly as it does? The heart of Google's search 
technology is PigeonRank™, a system for ranking web pages developed by 
Google founders Larry Page 
<http://www.google.com/corporate/execs.html#larry1> and Sergey Brin 
<http://www.google.com/corporate/execs.html#sergey1> at Stanford University.

PigeonRank System

Building upon the breakthrough work of B. F. Skinner 
<http://www.bfskinner.org/>, Page and Brin reasoned that low cost pigeon 
clusters (PCs) could be used to compute the relative value of web pages 
faster than human editors or machine-based algorithms. And while Google 
has dozens of engineers working to improve every aspect of our service 
on a daily basis, PigeonRank continues to provide the basis for all of 
our web search tools.

Why Google's patented PigeonRank™ works so well

PigeonRank's success relies primarily on the superior trainability of 
the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) and its unique capacity to recognize 
objects regardless of spatial orientation 
<http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pigeons+mental+rotations>. The 
common gray pigeon can easily distinguish among items displaying only 
the minutest differences, an ability that enables it to select relevant 
web sites from among thousands of similar pages.

By collecting flocks of pigeons in dense clusters, Google is able to 
process search queries at speeds superior to traditional search engines, 
which typically ...

Rohit Khare wrote:

> [...]
> Party Like It's 1995
> The commercial Web in 2003 is getting back to what worked years ago.
> By Kevin Werbach
> Posted Thursday, January 2, 2003, at 1:43 PM PT
> http://slate.msn.com/id/2076273/
>
> [...] although Yahoo!'s original claim to fame was helping Internet 
> users find Web sites and other online resources, it allowed Google to 
> become the king of that function today. Big mistake. [...]



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Hehe, ever wonder just how they (google) do it? the following is FoRKed from
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.google.com/technology/pigeonrank.html">http://www.google.com/technology/pigeonrank.html</a> - sorry about te html email.<br>
<br>
E<br>
____________________________________________<br>
<br>
 <font face="Arial, sans-serif"><b>The technology behind          Google's
great results</b></font>          
<p> As a Google user, you're familiar with the speed and accuracy of a  
         Google search. How exactly does Google manage to find the right
results            for every query as quickly as it does? The heart of Google's
search            technology is PigeonRank™, a system for ranking web pages
developed            by Google founders <a
 href="http://www.google.com/corporate/execs.html#larry1">Larry Page</a>
           and <a
 href="http://www.google.com/corporate/execs.html#sergey1">Sergey Brin</a>
at Stanford            University.</p>
         
<p><img src="http://www.google.com/technology/pigeon_system.jpg"
 width="580" height="129" alt="PigeonRank System" hspace="5">
</p>
         
<p> Building upon the breakthrough work of <a
 href="http://www.bfskinner.org/">B.            F. Skinner</a>, Page and
Brin reasoned that low cost pigeon clusters            (PCs) could be used
to compute the relative value of web pages faster            than human editors
or machine-based algorithms. And while Google has            dozens of engineers
working to improve every aspect of our service on            a daily basis,
PigeonRank continues to provide the basis for all of            our web search
tools.</p>
         
<p><b><font face="Arial, sans-serif">Why Google's patented PigeonRank™  
         works so well</font></b></p>
         
<p>PigeonRank's success relies primarily on the superior trainability   
        of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) and its unique capacity to
recognize            objects regardless of <a
 href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=pigeons+mental+rotations">spatial
           orientation</a>. The common gray pigeon can easily distinguish
among            items displaying only the minutest differences, an ability
that enables            it to select relevant web sites from among thousands
of similar pages.            </p>
         By collecting flocks of pigeons in dense clusters, Google is able
to            process search queries at speeds superior to traditional search
engines,            which typically ...<br>
<br>
Rohit Khare wrote:<br>
<blockquote type="cite"
 cite="midEC510565-2218-11D7-BDBD-000393A46DEA@alumni.caltech.edu">[...]<br>
Party Like It's 1995 <br>
The commercial Web in 2003 is getting back to what worked years ago. <br>
By Kevin Werbach <br>
Posted Thursday, January 2, 2003, at 1:43 PM PT <br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://slate.msn.com/id/2076273/">http://slate.msn.com/id/2076273/</a> <br>
 <br>
[...] although Yahoo!'s original claim to fame was helping Internet users
 find Web sites and other online resources, it allowed Google to become  the
king of that function today. Big mistake. [...]</blockquote>
<br>
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