[Fwd: The Costs of Making a DRAM Chip]

Eugen Leitl eugen@leitl.org
Sun, 26 Jan 2003 10:35:42 +0100 (CET)


On Thu, 23 Jan 2003, Joseph S. Barrera III wrote:

> Uh oh. Aren't we running out of nitrogen gas?
> Oh, and besides the water and nitrogen, they
> use chemicals as well...

Don't fret, we'll grow pentiums on trees some day.

Seriously, that the ecoaudit of semiconductor photolitho is just awful is 
hardly news.

There's not that much what we can do overnight, but inkjet and
nanolithoprinting is coming. Plastik ink and quantum dots are easy enough
to cook up, and get transferred to surface in one step. Molecular
circuitry is environmentally very friendly, especially if machine-phase 
lands. (Of course, it'd better land within a human lifespan, or less).
 
> - Joe
> 
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: The Costs of Making a DRAM Chip
> Date: 23 Jan 2003 18:26:07 -0000
> From: brian-slashdotnews@hyperreal.org
> To: slashdotnews@hyperreal.org
> 
> Link: http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/01/23/168225
> Posted by: michael, on 2003-01-23 17:57:03
> Topic: tech2, 51 comments
> 
>     from the paying-the-price dept.
>     [1]Anonymous Coward writes "Researchers at the United Nations
>     University in Tokyo [2]studied the physical and environmental costs to
>     produce one 32-megabyte DRAM chip. Their conclusion? The UNU team
>     found that to make every one of the millions manufactured each year
>     requires 32 kg of water, 1.6 kg of fossil fuels, 700 grams of
>     elemental gases (mainly nitrogen), and 72 grams of chemicals (hundreds
>     are used, including lethal arsine gas and corrosive hydrogen
>     fluoride)."
> 
> References
> 
>     1. http://home.earthlink.net/~kspandle
>     2. http://www.japantimes.com/cgi-bin/getarticle.pl5?fe20030123sh.htm
> 
> 
> 
> .
> 
> 
> 

-- 
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