The Town Where I Live

Gregory Alan Bolcer gbolcer@endeavors.com
Fri, 07 Mar 2003 07:18:08 -0800


Anaheim is going to replace Irvine
as the i-ching.[1] ;-)  In terms of
bandwidth, the most widely used wide-area
data isn't horoscopes and stock quotes--it's
field survey and GIS data. [2]  ESRI's
pretty much the gorilla of the industry.

Greg

[1] http://events.geocomm.com/features/gita2003/

Tadpole-Cartesia will be showing off GeoSync. GeoSync is synchronization technology for ESRI's ArcGIS product
and brings currency to the datasets of occasionally
                       connected field users via a company's LAN, WAN, or over the Internet. A unique product,
its embedded peer to peer technology securely ensures the bi-direction flow of
                       information to and from the field. The product is being embedded into the core products
of such ESRI business partners as Miner & Miner, and deployed by such municipalities
                       as the City of Anaheim. 

[2] http://www.tadpole.com/dynamic/news/2003/104.html


                      Tadpole-Cartesia Now Shipping Its ESRI-based GeoSync Software Empowering Simplified and
Secure Field GIS Currency

                      Tadpole's data synchronization and secure peer-to-peer technologies enable utilities to
securely distribute pockets of GIS
                      updates to authenticated mobile users

                      Carlsbad (California) and Edinburgh (UK), February 19, 2003: Tadpole-Cartesia, the field
mapping software subsidiary of Tadpole Technology (LSE:TAD), today announces GA of its ESRI-based
                      GeoSync (View) 8.3 geospatial synchronization technology for worldwide utilities. The
technology is being integrated into the software products of such GIS leaders as Miner & Miner. 

                      Showcased this month at Miner & Miner's User Group, Tadpole-Cartesia's new solution
automates and secures the delivery of geospatial data from central servers to the field. Instead of streaming
                      gigabyte-heavy maps to regional offices or mobile work teams that connect occasionally
to the Web, only packets of new mapping data will now be delivered to authenticated users. Maps stored on
local
                      desktops and laptops are automatically updated.