David Kelly's death: suicide or murder?

jbone at place.org jbone at place.org
Thu Oct 23 09:28:43 PDT 2003


Via Lisa Rein, a welcome relief from the multiple daily Daily Show 
recaps. ;-)

--

http://www.onlisareinsradar.com/archives/001889.php

The Shrub War - WMD Lies
October 23, 2003
Evidence Surfacing On the Suicide Murder Of David Kelly

The evidence is starting to pour in to suggest that David Kelly (the 
microbiologist that became the center of the controversy surrounding 
Britain's bogus WMD evidence that the Shrub Administration used as 
justification for the war on Iraq) did not commit suicide at all.


MEDIUM RARE
By Jim Rarey for From The Wilderness.

(This first part lays out the case from the evidence presented in the 
Hutton inquiry why the death of Dr. David Kelly was not by suicide. 
Part two will show the reasons, in this writer's opinion, Dr. Kelly was 
killed.)...

While the Hutton inquiry appears set to declare Kelly's death a suicide 
and the national media are already treating it as a given, there are 
numerous red flags raised in the testimony and evidence at the inquiry 
itself.

Kelly's body was likely moved from where he died to the site where two 
search volunteers with a search dog found it. The body was propped up 
against a tree according to the testimony of both volunteers. The 
volunteers reported the find to police headquarters, Thames Valley 
Police (TVP) and then left the scene. On their way back to their car, 
they met three "police" officers, one of them named Detective Constable 
Graham Peter Coe.

Coe and his men were alone at the site for 25-30 minutes before the 
first police actually assigned to search the area arrived (Police 
Constables Sawyer and Franklin) and took charge of the scene from Coe. 
They found the body flat on its back a short distance from the tree, as 
did all subsequent witnesses.

A logical explanation is that Dr. Kelly died at a different site and 
the body was transported to the place it was found. This is buttressed 
by the medical findings of livor mortis (post mortem lividity), which 
indicates that Kelly died on his back, or at least was moved to that 
position shortly after his death. Propping the body against the tree 
was a mistake that had to be rectified.

The search dog and its handler must have interrupted whoever was 
assigned to go back and move the body to its back before it was done. 
After the volunteers left the scene the body was moved to its back 
while DC Coe was at the scene.

Five witnesses said in their testimony that two men accompanied Coe. 
Yet, in his testimony, Coe maintained there was only one other beside 
himself. He was not questioned about the discrepancy.

Researchers, including this writer, assume the presence of the "third 
man" could not be satisfactorily explained and so was being denied.

Additionally, Coe's explanation of why he was in the area is 
unsubstantiated. To the contrary, when PC Franklin was asked if Coe was 
part of the search team he responded, "No. He was at the scene. I had 
no idea what he was doing there or why he was there. He was just at the 
scene when PC Sawyer and I arrived."

Franklin was responsible for coordinating the search with the chief 
investigating officer and then turning it over to Sawyer to assemble 
the search team and take them to the assigned area. They were just 
starting to leave the station (about 9am on the 18th) to be the first 
search team on the ground (excepting the volunteers with the search 
dog) when they got word the body had been found.

A second red flag is the nature of the wounds on Kelly's wrist. Dr. 
Nicholas Hunt, who performed the autopsy, testified there were several 
superficial "scratches" or cuts on the wrist and one deep wound that 
severed the ulnar artery but not the radial artery.

The fact that the ulnar artery was severed, but not the radial artery, 
strongly suggests that the knife wound was inflicted drawing the blade 
from the inside of the wrist (the little finger side closest to the 
body) to the outside where the radial artery is located much closer to 
the surface of the skin than is the ulnar artery. For those familiar 
with first aid, the radial artery is the one used to determine the 
pulse rate.

Just hold your left arm out with the palm up and see how difficult it 
would be to slash across the wrist avoiding the radial artery while 
severing the ulnar artery. However, a second person situated to the 
left of Kelly who held or picked up the arm and slashed across the 
wrist would start on the inside of the wrist severing the ulnar artery 
first.

A reasonably competent medical examiner or forensic pathologist would 
certainly be able to determine in which direction the knife was drawn 
across the wrist. That question was never asked nor the answer 
volunteered. In fact, a complete autopsy report would state in which 
direction the wounds were inflicted. The coroner's inquest was never 
completed as it was preempted by the Hutton inquiry and the autopsy 
report will not be made public. Neither will the toxicology report.

Here is the full text of the article in case the link goes bad:

http://www.fromthewilderness.com/free/ww3/101403_kelly_1.html

October 14, 2003

THE MURDER OF DAVID KELLY

Part one of two

(This first part lays out the case from the evidence presented in the 
Hutton inquiry why the death of Dr. David Kelly was not by suicide. 
Part two will show the reasons, in this writer's opinion, Dr. Kelly was 
killed.)

On Thursday, July 17th sometime between 3 and 3:30pm, Dr. David Kelly 
started out on his usual afternoon walk. About 18 hours later, 
searchers found his body, left wrist slit, in a secluded lane on 
Harrowdown Hill. Kelly, the U.K.'s premier microbiologist, was in the 
center of a political maelstrom having been identified as the "leak" in 
information about the "dossier" Prime Minister Tony Blair had used to 
justify the war against Iraq.

While the Hutton inquiry appears set to declare Kelly's death a suicide 
and the national media are already treating it as a given, there are 
numerous red flags raised in the testimony and evidence at the inquiry 
itself.

Kelly's body was likely moved from where he died to the site where two 
search volunteers with a search dog found it. The body was propped up 
against a tree according to the testimony of both volunteers. The 
volunteers reported the find to police headquarters, Thames Valley 
Police (TVP) and then left the scene. On their way back to their car, 
they met three "police" officers, one of them named Detective Constable 
Graham Peter Coe.

Coe and his men were alone at the site for 25-30 minutes before the 
first police actually assigned to search the area arrived (Police 
Constables Sawyer and Franklin) and took charge of the scene from Coe. 
They found the body flat on its back a short distance from the tree, as 
did all subsequent witnesses.

A logical explanation is that Dr. Kelly died at a different site and 
the body was transported to the place it was found. This is buttressed 
by the medical findings of livor mortis (post mortem lividity), which 
indicates that Kelly died on his back, or at least was moved to that 
position shortly after his death. Propping the body against the tree 
was a mistake that had to be rectified.

The search dog and its handler must have interrupted whoever was 
assigned to go back and move the body to its back before it was done. 
After the volunteers left the scene the body was moved to its back 
while DC Coe was at the scene.

Five witnesses said in their testimony that two men accompanied Coe. 
Yet, in his testimony, Coe maintained there was only one other beside 
himself. He was not questioned about the discrepancy.

Researchers, including this writer, assume the presence of the "third 
man" could not be satisfactorily explained and so was being denied.

Additionally, Coe's explanation of why he was in the area is 
unsubstantiated. To the contrary, when PC Franklin was asked if Coe was 
part of the search team he responded, "No. He was at the scene. I had 
no idea what he was doing there or why he was there. He was just at the 
scene when PC Sawyer and I arrived."

Franklin was responsible for coordinating the search with the chief 
investigating officer and then turning it over to Sawyer to assemble 
the search team and take them to the assigned area. They were just 
starting to leave the station (about 9am on the 18th) to be the first 
search team on the ground (excepting the volunteers with the search 
dog) when they got word the body had been found.

A second red flag is the nature of the wounds on Kelly's wrist. Dr. 
Nicholas Hunt, who performed the autopsy, testified there were several 
superficial "scratches" or cuts on the wrist and one deep wound that 
severed the ulnar artery but not the radial artery.

The fact that the ulnar artery was severed, but not the radial artery, 
strongly suggests that the knife wound was inflicted drawing the blade 
from the inside of the wrist (the little finger side closest to the 
body) to the outside where the radial artery is located much closer to 
the surface of the skin than is the ulnar artery. For those familiar 
with first aid, the radial artery is the one used to determine the 
pulse rate.

Just hold your left arm out with the palm up and see how difficult it 
would be to slash across the wrist avoiding the radial artery while 
severing the ulnar artery. However, a second person situated to the 
left of Kelly who held or picked up the arm and slashed across the 
wrist would start on the inside of the wrist severing the ulnar artery 
first.

A reasonably competent medical examiner or forensic pathologist would 
certainly be able to determine in which direction the knife was drawn 
across the wrist. That question was never asked nor the answer 
volunteered. In fact, a complete autopsy report would state in which 
direction the wounds were inflicted. The coroner's inquest was never 
completed as it was preempted by the Hutton inquiry and the autopsy 
report will not be made public. Neither will the toxicology report.

Two paramedics who arrived by ambulance at the same time as Franklin 
and Sawyer (some time after 9am) and accompanied them to where the body 
was located. After checking the eyes and signs of a pulse or breathing, 
they attached four electro-cardiogram pads to Kelly's chest and hooked 
them up to a portable electro-cardiograph. When no signs of heart 
activity were found they unofficially confirmed death. One paramedic 
(Vanessa Hunt) said the Police asked them to leave the pads on the 
body. The other paramedic (David Bartlett) said they always left the 
pads on the body.

Both paramedics testified that DC Coe had two men with him. Curiously, 
both also volunteered that there was a surprisingly small amount of 
blood at the scene for an artery having been severed.

When the forensic pathologist (Dr. Nicholas Hunt) who performed the 
autopsy testified, he described copious amounts of blood at the scene. 
He also described scratches and bruises that Kelly "stumbling around" 
in the heavy underbrush may have caused. He said there was no 
indication of a struggle or Kelly having been forcibly restrained.

However, the police made an extensive search of the area and found no 
indication of anyone, including Kelly, having been in the heavy 
underbrush.

Strangely, none of the witnesses mentioned anything about rigor mortis 
(stiffening of the body) which is useful in setting the approximate 
time of death. Even Dr. Hunt, when was asked directly what changes on 
the body he observed that would have happened after death, failed to 
mention rigor mortis. He only named livor mortis. Hunt set the time of 
death within a range of 4:15pm on the 17th to 1:15am the next morning. 
He based the estimate on body temperature which he did not take until 
7:15pm on the 18th, some seven hours after he arrived on the scene.

A forensic biologist (Roy James Green) had been asked to examine the 
scene. He said the amount of blood he saw was consistent with a severed 
artery. Green works for the same private company (Forensic Alliance) as 
Dr. Hunt. A majority of the company's work is done for police 
organizations.

The afternoon of the 18th DC Coe turned up at the Kelly residence 
accompanied by a man identified only as "an attachment," who acted as 
an "exhibits officer" presumably collecting documents in behalf of some 
other government agency.

Detective Constable Coe and those accompanying him are somewhat of a 
mystery. There are no corroborating witnesses to any of his actions to 
which he testified (other than "just being there" at the scene where 
the body was found).

However, on a listing of evidence provided to the Hutton inquiry by 
Thames Valley Police is a reference to a document described thusly, 
"TVP Tactical Support Major Incident Policy Book…Between 1430 17.07.03 
and 930 18.07.03. DCI Alan Young. It is labeled "not for release – 
Police operational information." Many of the exhibits are labeled that 
way or are not to be released as personal information.

The police took over 300 statements from witnesses but less than 70 
were forwarded to the Hutton inquiry. Witness statements were not to be 
released (even to the inquiry) unless the witness signed an 
authorization permitting it. TVP also withheld witness interviews they 
did not consider "relevant" to the inquiry. Witnesses were not put 
under oath so it is impossible for the public to know if their public 
statements are at variance with what they told police. The ‘tactical 
support" document must have been considered relevant to the inquiry on 
Kelly's death or it wouldn't have been forwarded.

So this "tactical support" began at 2:30pm on the 17th, about one hour 
before Dr. Kelly left the house on his final walk. It ended at 9:30am 
the following morning about the time DC Coe and his men left the death 
scene. The obvious question is, to what was TVP giving tactical 
support? The name given the effort was "Operation Mason."

(In part two of this report, we will lay out some of the reasons (that 
you won't see in the national media) Dr. Kelly could not be allowed to 
live.)


(In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is 
distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest 
in receiving the included information for research and educational 
purposes.)

Permission is granted to reproduce this article in its entirety .


The author is a freelance writer based in Romulus, Michigan. He is a 
former newspaper editor and investigative reporter, a retired customs 
administrator and accountant, and a student of history and the U.S. 
Constitution.

If you would like to receive Medium Rare articles directly, please 
contact the author at jimrarey at comcast.net 


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