Cornell News: No ice found at lunar poles (fwd fromljk4@msn.com)

Gregory Alan Bolcer gbolcer at endeavors.com
Wed Nov 12 13:36:05 PST 2003


I remember when they announced the first finding.  They
had visions of refueling stations on the moon.  So I guess
that means we have to wait for nanotech moondew gathering
technology to mature first. 

Greg


----- Original Message -----
From: cunews at cornell.edu
Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2003 1:15 PM
To: CUNEWS-PHYSICAL_SCIENCE-L at cornell.edu; CUNEWS-SCIENCE-L at cornell.edu
Subject: Cornell News: No ice found at lunar poles

Arecibo radar shows no evidence of thick ice at lunar poles, despite
data from previous spacecraft probes, researchers say

EMBARGOED  UNTIL  WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12, 2003, AT 1 P.M. EST

Contact:  David Brand
Office:  607-255-3651
E-mail:  deb27 at cornell.edu


ARECIBO, P.R.  --  Despite evidence from two space probes in the 
1990s, radar astronomers say they can find no signs of thick ice at 
the moon's poles. If there is water at the lunar poles, the 
researchers say, it is widely scattered and permanently frozen inside 
the dust layers, something akin to terrestrial permafrost.

Using the 70-centimeter (cm)-wavelength radar system at the National 
Science Foundation's (NSF) Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico, the 
research group sent signals deeper into the lunar polar surface -- 
more than five meters (about 5.5 yards) -- than ever before at this 
spatial resolution. "If there is ice at the poles, the only way left 
to test it is to go there directly and melt a small volume around the 
dust and look for water with a mass spectrometer," says Bruce 
Campbell of the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the 
Smithsonian Institution.

Campbell is the lead author of an article, "Long-Wavelength Radar 
Probing of the Lunar Poles," in the Nov. 13, 2003, issue of the 
journal Nature. His collaborators on the latest radar probe of the 
moon were Donald Campbell, professor of astronomy at Cornell 
University; J.F. Chandler of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; 
and Alice Hine, Mike Nolan and Phil Perillat of the Arecibo 
Observatory, which is managed by the National Astronomy and 
Ionosphere Center at Cornell for the NSF.





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