[FoRK] A thought on Design and Quality

Stephen D. Williams sdw at lig.net
Wed Oct 7 10:38:20 PDT 2009


> No one's saying you have to care.  Just that it's more than a bit lame to
> try comparing what's out now with ancient OSes that did appreciably less.
>
> Feel free to crawl backward any time you like.   There's probably an
> emulator out there that'll assist the reminiscence.

Write your new scalable web app for the Apollo Guidance Computer:
http://www.ibiblio.org/apollo/

I dug in to full-time development in the age of CP/M, Atari 400/800, and
the very first PC.  And Version 7 Unix / VMS / PDP-7 / PDP-11.  Teletypes,
terminal-based command lines (curses et al), and most of the early
windowing systems and networking.

There are many, many innovations.  There is really only superficial
similarity between "then" and now.  Of course we are still using (or
getting back to reusing) the best ideas from the past, however there is so
much more in between that it really isn't the same thing at all.

Often these extra bits are philosophical sophistication.  REST for
instance.  Message orientation.  (I was doing it at NCR in the 80's, and
later at AOL and elsewhere, but it has only in the last few years become
widely accepted and designed in.)

sdw

>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
>> On Wed, Oct 07, 2009 at 08:53:29AM -0400, Bill Kearney wrote:
>>
>>> Which has no real comparison to the number of tasks and applications a
>>> current OS is likely to be running.
>>
>> Why do I have to care about the tasks and applications that
>> are running?
>>
>>> Whether or not they /need/ to be able to run all that is an entirely
>>> different question...
>>
>> See, that's more the problem. I hesitate to go back to more
>> spartanic environments. But sooner or later, it probably has
>> to happen.
>
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