[FoRK] Beware of Skinny Men with Green Teeth

Stephen Williams sdw at lig.net
Tue Jan 19 13:32:10 PST 2010


Speaking of Yemen, no wonder it is a failed state:

> Khat is ... euphoria and excitement. ... pleasuring effect to the same 
> degree as ecstasy ... may appear to be unrealistic and emotionally 
> unstable ... can induce manic behaviors and hyperactivity ... state of 
> drowsy hallucinations ... include mild depression and irritability ... 
> lethargy, mild depression, nightmares, and slight tremor ... causes 
> loss of appetite, so most of its users are underweight ... negative 
> impact on liver function, permanent tooth darkening (of a greenish 
> tinge), susceptibility to ulcers, and diminished sex drive ... feeling 
> tired and having difficulty concentrating ... “an amphetamine-like 
> substance”, and those who use it are more likely to develop mental 
> illnesses ... a psychosis can result, resembling a hypomanic state.

Good luck with that!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khat
> The earliest recorded use of khat medically is believed to be within 
> the New Testament.[5]

> Khat is so popular in Yemen that its cultivation consumes much of the 
> country's agricultural resources. It is estimated that 40% of the 
> country's water supply goes towards irrigating it [12], with 
> production increasing by about 10% to 15% every year. Water 
> consumption is so high that groundwater levels in the Sanaa basin are 
> diminishing; because of this, government officials have proposed 
> relocating large portions of the population of Sanaa to the coast of 
> the Red Sea.[11] One reason for cultivating khat in Yemen so widely is 
> the high income it provides for farmers. Some studies done in 2001 
> estimated that the income from cultivating khat was about 2.5 million 
> Yemeni rials per hectare, while it was only 0.57 million rials per 
> hectare if fruits were cultivated. This is a strong reason farmers 
> prefer to cultivate khat over coffee and fruits. It is estimated that 
> between 1970 and 2000, the area on which khat was cultivated grew from 
> 8,000 hectares to 103,000 hectares.[13]
>
> In Somalia, the Supreme Islamic Courts Council, which took control of 
> much of the country in 2006, banned khat during Ramadan, sparking 
> street protests in Kismayo. In November 2006, Kenya banned all flights 
> to Somalia, citing security concerns, prompting protests by Kenyan 
> khat growers. The Kenyan Member of Parliament from Ntonyiri, Meru 
> North District stated that local land had been specialized in khat 
> cultivation, that 20 tons worth $800,000 were shipped to Somalia daily 
> and that a flight ban could devastate the local economy.[14] With the 
> victory of the Provisional Government backed by Ethiopian forces in 
> the end of December 2006, khat has returned to the streets of 
> Mogadishu, though Kenyan traders have noted demand has not yet 
> returned to pre-ban levels.[15]

> Khat consumption induces mild euphoria and excitement. A meta-analysis 
> in The Lancet has stated that khat creates a pleasuring effect to the 
> same degree as ecstasy. Individuals become very talkative under the 
> influence of the drug and may appear to be unrealistic and emotionally 
> unstable. Khat can induce manic behaviors and hyperactivity. Khat is 
> an effective anorectic and its use also results in constipation. 
> Dilated pupils (mydriasis), which are prominent during khat 
> consumption, reflect the sympathomimetic effects of the drug, which 
> are also reflected in increased heart rate and blood pressure. A state 
> of drowsy hallucinations (hypnagogic hallucinations) may result coming 
> down from khat use as well. Withdrawal symptoms that may follow 
> occasional use include mild depression and irritability. Withdrawal 
> symptoms that may follow prolonged khat use include lethargy, mild 
> depression, nightmares, and slight tremor. The Khat also causes loss 
> of appetite, so most of its users are underweight. Long-term use can 
> precipitate the following effects: negative impact on liver function, 
> permanent tooth darkening (of a greenish tinge), susceptibility to 
> ulcers, and diminished sex drive. Those who abuse the drug generally 
> cannot stay without it for more than 4–5 days, feeling tired and 
> having difficulty concentrating.Some researchers also say that  “an 
> amphetamine-like substance”, and those who use it are more likely to 
> develop mental illnesses. Others say that these mental illnesses are 
> the result of the financial problems and the sleeplessness that the 
> drug causes. But it is still unclear if the consumption of the Khat 
> directly affects the mental health of the user or not.[16] 
> Occasionally a psychosis can result, resembling a hypomanic state in 
> presentation.[23]

sdw





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