[FoRK] Misunderestimating "The" Tea Party

Damien Morton dmorton at bitfurnace.com
Sat Mar 20 21:18:06 PDT 2010


On Sun, Mar 21, 2010 at 2:32 PM, Damien Morton <dmorton at bitfurnace.com>wrote:

> On Sun, Mar 21, 2010 at 12:22 PM, Jeff Bone <jbone at place.org> wrote:
>
>>
>> Damien asks:
>>
>>  Since, in the mists of time, we started of with multiple smaller "units
>> of
>> aggregation", and in every region, without fail, those smaller "units of
>> aggregation" aggregated into larger and larger "units of aggregation",
>> would
>> you say that the exploration space has been explored and larger units of
>> aggregation were found to be better than small ones?
>>
>> I've actually drafted a response that treats this question seriously, but
>> before I post it I really must ask...  Damien, do you really, honestly
>> believe any reasonable person who really thinks about the actual question
>> (i.e., the question of exploration of the space, not the question of what I
>> would say about it) could answer "yes"?  I.e., do *you* believe that the
>> answer to whether the space has been well-explored and larger units found
>> better than small ones is "yes"?
>>
>>
> The proof is in the pudding - we know that there were smaller units of
> aggregation all across the world, city-states are one example. We observe
> the world around us, and except for a few examples such as
> Monaco, Lichtenstein, Hong Kong, Singapore, and a few others, they no longer
> exist. The reasons vary - but the image of the Roman Fasces comes to mind.
> "Strength through Unity".
>
> You can dissagregate all you like, but me and my mates are going to
> aggregate the fuck up, then come over and take your women and break your
> stuff, and there's nothing you can do about it because no libertarian
> quacking can beat the raw organisational power and glory of a gazilion boots
> marching in lockstep. Hell, we might even be munificent enough to allow you
> to go on with your libertarian ways, but you better pay your taxes or we
> will fuck your shit up.
>
> Aggregators built the pyramids, put men on the moon, build
> continental highway systems, hoover dams, and many of humanities
> greatest achievements, while the best libertarians have to offer is hiding
> out in the woods with the Unabomber, scratching out crazed diaries for
> future civilisations to study
>


Actually, I am being a little bit disingenuous. There was
an excellent article a few years back in the Economist, discussing the
upswing of regionalism within the EU. Basically, with the creation of the
EU, former "smaller units of aggregation" such as Scotland, Catalonia, etc,
with desires for more independent policy can assert themselves more easily.
Its a few years ago, and I cant remember the details of the article, nor can
I now find it.

I hate to say it, but this, in some way, this supports your argument, with
the subtlety that aggregation and disaggregation are happening
simultaneously - and seemingly supported by each other.


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