[FoRK] No More Cursive?

Ken Ganshirt @ Yahoo ken_ganshirt at yahoo.ca
Wed Aug 24 19:40:53 PDT 2011


I'll just say that your notion of learning a language is a tad narrower than mine.

         ...ken...


--- On Wed, 8/24/11, Stephen Williams <sdw at lig.net> wrote:

> I agree with Dave.  While there
> is a critical period for learning language at all and
> learning a language as a native speaker, it is not the
> period where you can learn the fastest.  In terms of
> raw bits acquired, a focused adult (which rarely happens)
> who hasn't forgotten how to learn (or better, has sharpened
> the habit) can learn much faster than young children. 
> That doesn't mean that can easily or at all get past the
> pidgin / creole level of using a language "natively", but
> that they can learn raw bits (vocabulary, etc.)
> faster.  Having an extensive existing mental language
> framework makes hanging new terms on those nodes much
> faster, except perhaps where the languages clash
> conceptually.  A Chinese speaker, where most language
> tenses aren't "native" to the language learning English or a
> Romance language with past pluperfect etc. for instance.
> 
> I think that adults are generally distracted by many other
> activities and tend to only allocate bits of time to
> something while a 5 year old is at something like language
> acquisition the whole time they are awake.
> 
> sdw
> 
> On Wed Aug 24 06:36:51 2011, Ken Ganshirt @ Yahoo wrote:
> > --- On Wed, 8/24/11, Dave Long<dave.long at bluewin.ch> wrote:
> > 
> >>> According to the Critical Theory
> >> Hypothesis, they may do fine, but there's a
> certain window
> >> when second, third, fourth language skills are at
> their
> >> peak.  Some say it ends at 6 or 7 and others
> say it
> >> ends at puberty.  11 would fit right into
> that theory.
> >>> 
> >>> Adults, on the other hand, need a lot of
> motivation
> >> and hard work to learn one.
> >> 
> >> 
> >> A critical period for a first language makes
> sense, and
> >> appears to have been observed in practice.
> >> 
> >> For second languages, however, this seems
> unlikely. ...
> > 
> > I don't understand why you would distinquish (first,
> second, third)?? It seems to me if there is a critical
> period for learning language it would hardly discriminate?
> It is during that observed critical period that it's easiest
> to learn language; your first and second and third, etc.
> > 
> >         
>    ...ken...
> > 
> > 
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