[FoRK] Blame Microsoft, Part Deux

Stephen D. Williams sdw at lig.net
Sat Nov 17 19:16:29 PST 2012


Microsoft did seem to get the USB drive booting working well for Windows 8, taking the Linux capability and extending the idea it 
seems. That could be very handy.
https://www.infoworld.com/d/microsoft-windows/windows-go-revisited-early-skeptic-recants-206954

However:
Hardware wise, while the RAM, CPU, and SD card are good, the resolution, cameras, and price are terrible on Microsoft Surface:
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/10/nexus-10-vs-apple-ipad-vs-microsoft-surface-rt/
> Screen Resolution Nexus 10: 2560 x 1600 pixel, 300 ppi, IPad4g: 2048 x 1536 pixel, 264 ppi, MS Surface:1366 x 768 pixel, 148 ppi

http://www.gizmag.com/surface-vs-nexus-10/24997/


IE 10: Buggy by design. There are so many ways this hack will fail and cause worse problems: proxies, VPN, running standard web apps 
locally and via the web, etc. This has got to be one of the stupidest technical decisions I've seen this year.

http://blogs.windows.com/windows_phone/b/wpdev/archive/2012/11/15/adapting-your-webkit-optimized-site-for-internet-explorer-10.aspx
>
> The next step is to double-check that Internet Explorer 10 will render your site in themost standards-compliant mode 
> <http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/hh920756%28v=vs.85%29.aspx>. Using standards mode provides the greatest support for 
> the latest standards, such as HTML5, CSS3, SVG, and others, as opposed to some of the older modes such as “quirks mode” which are 
> supported for backward compatibility. For most sites, this won’t require any work because standards mode is the default. The 
> easiest way to be sure is to include the HTML5*doctype*at the top of every page:
>
> <!DOCTYPE html>
>
> Standards mode also is the default for valid HTML 4.0+ and XHTML 1.0+ doctypes, as long as they don’t specify “Transitional”.
>
> If you’re testing your web pages on a local network (or “localhost”), you will need to temporarily force standards mode because IE 
> defaults into a backward-compatible mode for intranet sites. You can do this by adding the following tag to the*<head>*tag of the 
> page, or by adding the equivalent HTTP header:
>
> <meta http-equiv="x-ua-compatible" content="IE=edge" />
>
> After you have deployed the site to an internet domain you can remove the*<meta>*tag because it will no longer be needed.
>
> Some examples of*scenarios to avoid*that would push your site/out of standards mode/are:
>
>   * Not including a doctype declaration at all. Instead, use the HTML5 doctype mentioned above.
>   * Specifying a “transitional” doctype. Instead, remove the*Transitional*keyword or adopt the HTML5 doctype.
>   * Forcing a specific IE mode using the*x-ua-compatible*header with*IE=9*(or older version). Instead, specify*IE=edge*or remove
>     the*x-ua-compatible*header completely and use the HTML5 doctype.
>

Web developers are to blame for a lot of new problems in this area:
http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/02/webkit-isnt-breaking-the-web-you-are/

sdw

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