[FoRK] [IP] Re Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a location play

Gregory Alan Bolcer greg at bolcer.org
Tue Oct 7 11:51:07 PDT 2014


As I mentioned on another list: my new kickstarter campaign. An UWB device
that sits in your car and listens for your car alarm to go off and then
uses UWB to send you a text.   There you go, a $10 device to replace a $400
+ monthly fees, full cell stack system.

On Tue, Oct 7, 2014 at 8:45 AM, Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org> wrote:

> ----- Forwarded message from Dave Farber via ip <ip at listbox.com> -----
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 05:26:28 -0400
> From: Dave Farber via ip <ip at listbox.com>
> To: ip <ip at listbox.com>
> Subject: [IP] Re Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a
> location play
> Message-ID: <
> CAKx4trgx+Y94kr2mWGh6q5kKCMVjtExEuBr4hmgp0eM0jK9AGw at mail.gmail.com>
> Reply-To: dave at farber.net
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: *Krulwich* <krulwich at yahoo.com>
> Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2014
> Subject: [Dewayne-Net] Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a
> location play
> To: "dave at farber.net" <dave at farber.net>, ip <ip at listbox.com>
>
>
> Dave,
>
> The new generation of UWB is very different from the old. Old UWB was based
> on OFDM, with the goal of high-speed transfer. New UWB is based on impulse
> radio. Besides longer range and lower throughput, impulse radio directly
> enables much more accurate location positioning, since the radio waves
> themselves have a much sharper start and stop than narrowband radio waves.
>
> I explain this here:
>
> http://grizzlyanalytics.blogspot.com/2013/10/decawave-high-accuracy-indoor-location.html
>
> and show videos of demos of UWB from last year's Mobile World Congress
> here:
>
> http://grizzlyanalytics.blogspot.com/2014/02/two-indoor-location-demos-to-see-at-mwc.html
>
> http://grizzlyanalytics.blogspot.com/2014/07/recent-years-have-seen-constant.html
>
> I don't think the question now is whether UWB will "beat out" Wi-Fi or BT,
> but rather whether the goal of longer-range wireless or more-accurate
> location positioning will make including UWB in devices worthwhile.
>
> --Bruce
>
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* Dave Farber via ip <ip at listbox.com
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','ip at listbox.com');>>
> *To:* ip <ip at listbox.com <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','ip at listbox.com');>>
> *Sent:* Monday, October 6, 2014 9:12 PM
> *Subject:* [IP] Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a
> location play
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: "Dewayne Hendricks" <dewayne at warpspeed.com
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','dewayne at warpspeed.com');>>
> Date: Oct 6, 2014 1:32 PM
> Subject: [Dewayne-Net] Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a
> location play
> To: "Multiple recipients of Dewayne-Net" <dewayne-net at warpspeed.com
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','dewayne-net at warpspeed.com');>>
> Cc:
>
> Ultrawideband returns from the grave! This time as a location play.
> By Stacey Higginbotham
> Oct 6 2014
> <
>
> https://gigaom.com/2014/10/06/ultrawideband-returns-from-the-grave-this-time-as-a-location-play/
> >
>
> SUMMARY:
> Zombie technology UWB returns from the dead in a slightly modified format
> to offer incredibly granular location within a few inches for the internet
> of things.
>
> The dead walk among us, and they are apparently shipping silicon.
> Ultrawideband, a radio technology that uses unlicensed spectrum to send
> massive files short distances, is back in a slightly different form, hoping
> this time to provide location data for the internet of things.
> Ultrawideband or UWB, was pushed in the early aughts as a way to wirelessly
> dock a monitor or TV to a computer, but because of infighting in the
> standards-setting committee and international spectrum allocation issues,
> it never got very far.
>
> A half of dozen or so startups raised venture capital to build UWB chips
> and most of those were sold off and the standard itself was taken over by
> the Bluetooth Special Interest Group. But Decawave, a company based in
> Dublin, Ireland is now using UWB tech to offer granular, indoor location
> data. Decawave, which was formed in 2004 is set to ship about a million UWB
> radios this year and hopes to hit the 5 million mark in 2015 according to
> Mickael Viot, marketing manager at Decawave.
>
> He claims that UWB can offer location data that is accurate within 10
> centimeters to about 30 centimeters, which makes sense given that the
> radios only transmit a signal a very short distance. Customers in the
> industrial worldand automotive are already using the technology, and a
> smart home customer is also looking at it to provide detailed tracking
> information for lost items via a stick-on tag.
>
> Using UWB can offer higher data rates than Bluetooth Low Energy, and Viot
> claims that the modifications to the silicon that Decawave offers make for
> a chip that is still power-efficient. Right now, the form factor for the
> silicon is a bit large, but the next generation coming in 2015 will shrink
> the silicon and packaging to a more consumer-friendly size.
>
> [snip]
>
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-- 
greg at bolcer.org, http://bolcer.org, c: +1.714.928.5476


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