[FoRK] Quarters needed for Apple to put Microsoft out of our misery?

Lucas Gonze lucas.gonze at gmail.com
Fri Jan 30 16:08:10 PST 2015


I'd go with "IBM" for $100.

Because MS only reason to exist is their ability to serve enterprise IT
customers.

On Fri, Jan 30, 2015 at 3:21 PM, Stephen D. Williams <sdw at lig.net> wrote:

> On 1/30/15 3:02 PM, J. Andrew Rogers wrote:
>
>> On Jan 30, 2015, at 1:25 PM, Stephen D. Williams <sdw at lig.net> wrote:
>>>
>>> That's mostly fair, although there's little reason for most apps to be
>>> anything other than browser / Linux server based web apps.
>>>
>>
>> There is your disconnect in one sentence. You just described the thin
>> client. All the interesting, important, and valuable stuff is happening in
>> other parts of a vast back-end computing stack that you are ignoring.
>>
>> That aside, one reason to not use browsers for apps is that they offer
>> terrible user app experience for almost everything.
>>
>
> The "Browser" is evolving rapidly.  WegGL-based Oculus Rift experiences
> running in Firefox and sensing with a Leap or other 3D cameras, for
> instance, are just the start.
>
> That's a very narrow view.  There are plenty of interesting things that
> will happen on the client also, often within millimeters of sensors with
> constant streams of gigabytes of data for a few milliwatts.  Machine
> vision, for instance.  Computing and slinging polygons for another.  Mobile
> devices are actually ahead of desktops there in some key ways.  The typical
> experience is likely to be multi-device, multi-screen almost right away.
>
>  For servers, there's little competition for Linux.  For the desktop,
>>> where a lot of constant pain happens, containers would be one way for
>>> Windows to harden enough to be acceptable.  It is such a messy situation
>>> that may not happen.
>>>
>>
>> I haven’t used a Windows desktop since circa 2002. My desktops work just
>> fine.
>>
>
> Plenty do and it is the basis for most solid operating system and office
> suite income.
>
>
>>
>>  C++ is the common core language.
>>>
>>
>> Wait, are we talking about client environments or server environments?
>> You keep jumping around.
>>
>
> C++ is key in both in some sense, although seemingly secondary in both
> also.
>
>
>>
>>  Such as?  What might I consider integrating into a modern, scalable,
>>> efficient web app framework for both local and public cloud use?
>>>
>>
>> Web frameworks? Welcome to the future.
>>
>> Most of the value of the cloud for enterprises going forward is that
>> applications running there have direct access to extremely large, dynamic
>> data models and analytics of which you can ask simple ad hoc questions
>> without knowing anything about the scale, velocity, or topology of those
>> systems. It is seamless and magical as far as the developer is concerned.
>>
>
> And generally able to be substituted by an alternate implementation it
> seems.  Not all applications need those particular kinds of analytics.
> Many that do can outsource it.  How broadly do you think those types of
> systems are used and should / will be used?
>
>
>> The thin client is the most unimportant part of the environment. It could
>> be any kind of client app. All the real work is happening deep in the cloud
>> in places humans do not and cannot look.
>>
>
> For some apps.
>
> sdw
>
>
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