[FoRK] Nostalgy - keystroke filing in Thunderbird

Ken Meltsner meltsner at alum.mit.edu
Tue Mar 24 16:31:19 PDT 2015


You can slice up products finer than I do, but I found full text
search plus date was sufficient.  It's not like project work, where
there is essentially nothing in common between customer projects.
Regardless, at least my former employer got rid of its "Delete all
email after 90 days" rule which was essentially driven by fears of
discovery but usually meant that our corporate memory had that problem
where nothing makes it from short-term memory into long-term storage.

The name for all of this should be something like "attention
management."  Long time ago, I proposed that we should re-purpose an
anti-spam product into a tool that would auto-digest, run some sort of
procmail tool to pull out useful values from machine-generated emails,
etc.  Never went anywhere -- I guess our product management wasn't
getting dozens of "a change has been committed" messages a day.

There's a fair portion of these capabilities with a service like
Zapier combined with a notification manager like Slack if you're
technically inclined.  Unroll.me is the consumer version, I think --
huge help with chatty stores and other useful (but not terribly
important) services.

Ken

On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 6:15 PM, Stephen D. Williams <sdw at lig.net> wrote:
> On 3/24/15 4:06 PM, Ken Meltsner wrote:
>>
>> When I was actively working in Services, I opened a folder for each
>> project/customer -- I'd open a new folder if I had a second project
>> with the customer but with a gap.(there wasn't much in common
>> typically between project A and B even when they were at the same
>> customer)
>>
>> Made it really easy to archive current work, as well as helping with
>> locating old files; the most common lookup would be "What did we send
>> them for a project <deliverable> two years ago?"  Also simplified
>> collecting documents when I had to get someone new up to speed.  If
>> you're not project-oriented, this sort of structure doesn't make sense
>> -- when I moved to solutions development, almost all of my email would
>> be relating to a single product.
>
>
> Aren't there other ways to slice it even there?
>
>>
>> The issue here, perhaps, are the different ways that mail gets
>> structured.  Outlook likes to differentiate between sent and received
>> mail (although the newer versions will show both in a thread).  Gmail
>> doesn't mind if a single message has multiple tags and the threading
>> is pretty good.  Traditional Unix-y mail acts more like Outlook, I
>> think, but it's been a long time since I regularly read mail on a Unix
>> box, to be honest.
>>
>> Google Inbox does a good job of handling the sorting of
>> important/unimportant mail and allows tagged mail to be bundled
>> together in the inbox view (sort of like an in-place digesting) as
>> well as cool features like showing my flights in a more graphic form.
>
>
> Thunderbird now fully supports tagging in messages.  I don't use it yet,
> being folder organized forever, but I will at some point.
>
> The magical email reactions are cool.  Hopefully we'll get a nice open event
> / reaction system that is integrated in our email and other streams.
> All related to pain points for me that I'm interested in.
>
>
>>
>> On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 3:52 PM, Stephen D. Williams <sdw at lig.net> wrote:
>>>
>>> I was thinking of creating something like this because I really needed
>>> it,
>>> but of course it already exists:
>>>
>>> Nostalgy makes it easy to save or copy messages to a folder or go to a
>>> particular folder.  This greatly reduces effort between making a decision
>>> and making it happen: It is just an obvious keystroke.  So, from the list
>>> of
>>> standard folders that I use below, I can assign alt-d to "save message to
>>> sdw at lig.net:dev".  "Save" here means to move the message from the current
>>> folder to that folder. Unfortunately, it is Thunderbird wide, so it needs
>>> different keystrokes for the same idea in different accounts.
>>>
>>>
>>> https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/addon/nostalgy/contribute/roadblock/
>>> https://github.com/alainfrisch/nostalgy
>>>
>>> I don't see a way to do this with gmail:
>>> https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6594?hl=en
>>>
>>> I like to clear my inbox daily.  Of the sometimes hundreds of messages I
>>> get
>>> every day, some I can use 'a' for quickly archiving messages.  I pretty
>>> much
>>> use that for spam.  For the rest, I use these folders for most things.  I
>>> still have quite a few procmailrc rules, but many messages aren't
>>> handled,
>>> often because I want to be aware of them first.
>>>
>>> 0todo
>>> 1realTodo
>>> AI
>>> bought
>>> dev
>>> ed
>>> family
>>> friends
>>> legal
>>> meetups
>>> nleads (hiring / job releated)
>>> press (catch all, non-spam misc.)
>>> relocation (should be home, anything related to living/moving)
>>> subscriptions
>>> travel
>>>
>>> And a few specifics:
>>> FoRK
>>> flight
>>> photography
>>> writing
>>>
>>> Does anyone have a better or significantly different folder organization?
>>>
>>> Stephen
>>>
>>> --
>>> Stephen D. Williams sdw at lig.net stephendwilliams at gmail.com LinkedIn:
>>> http://sdw.st/in
>>> V:650-450-UNIX (8649) V:866.SDW.UNIX V:703.371.9362 F:703.995.0407
>>> AIM:sdw Skype:StephenDWilliams Yahoo:sdwlignet Resume: http://sdw.st/gres
>>> Personal: http://sdw.st facebook.com/sdwlig twitter.com/scienteer
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> FoRK mailing list
>>> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Stephen D. Williams sdw at lig.net stephendwilliams at gmail.com LinkedIn:
> http://sdw.st/in
> V:650-450-UNIX (8649) V:866.SDW.UNIX V:703.371.9362 F:703.995.0407
> AIM:sdw Skype:StephenDWilliams Yahoo:sdwlignet Resume: http://sdw.st/gres
> Personal: http://sdw.st facebook.com/sdwlig twitter.com/scienteer
>
> _______________________________________________
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> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork



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After 30+ years of email, I have used up my supply of clever ,sig material.


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